All Posts In Holidays

Food Network Chefs Answer: “What Do You Do with All Those Thanksgiving Leftovers?”

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 19th, 2015

Alex GuarnaschelliThere are two schools of thought when it comes to Thanksgiving leftovers: classic and creative. You can either keep the day-after eats exceedingly simple, with fixings smashed between slices of bread for rustic sandwiches, or you can dress up the goods that remain and turn them into all-new meals worthy of their holiday. FN Dish checked in with some of your favorite Food Network chefs to see how they put leftovers to work, and as it turns out, they, too, lean toward either easy-does-it sandwiches or inspired, next-level creations. Read on below to see what they have to say, and then leave a comment telling us how your family enjoys leftovers.

Alex Guarnaschelli

The first day, you eat a sandwich, you eat a salad, you’re just kind of eating, you’re grazing again, because you’re having the meal again. But, then the day after, if you still have a lot of leftovers, you’ve got to get creative, because people start to get that look in their eye, like they want to order a pizza. I like to make what’s called a hachis parmentier, which is like a shepherd’s pie. And you just chop up whatever turkey meat — and this way you can use the not-so-pretty pieces and the little scraps — and put that in the bottom of some gravy or some stock and then cover it with the leftover mash or the leftover potato gratin, or the leftover sweet potatoes, and you bake it with a layer of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese on top, until it gets all bubbly. And it’s sort of, like, a really beautiful garbage to throw all your leftovers in, bake it and have, like, this delicious, bubbling hot thing.

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Cranberries Every Way: Sauces, Salads and More

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 18th, 2015

Cranberry SaucesIt’s cranberry season! Very soon now, those ubiquitous tart, little red berries will undoubtedly be making their way to your Thanksgiving table. Cranberry sauce is one of the most-beloved holiday flavors, and it is part of nearly everyone’s menu. But for many people, cranberry sauce is often an afterthought that’s usually uncreative and never a showstopper — just a box to check off in the “must have” category.

But cranberries are beautiful, delicious and so much more versatile than you think. Why not give your regular recipe an upgrade this year? Here are some great ideas for fresh cranberries. Read more

Coming to a Mug Near You: Homemade Hot Chocolate

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 17th, 2015

Slow-Cooker Peppermint Hot ChocolateA steamy mug of hot cocoa is inarguably the best way to counter the cold weather. Though you could go the store-bought route and swirl powdered hot cocoa mix into hot water or milk, going the extra mile and making your own chocolatey blend from scratch is totally worth it. Get our top homemade hot chocolate recipes for sipping all winter long.

Food Network Kitchen’s Slow-Cooker Peppermint Hot Chocolate is one festively minty recipe that you shouldn’t wait until the holidays are in full swing to savor. It’s made and served all in one pot, and it’s thickened and enriched with dark chocolate.

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On Thanksgiving Day, Watch a Turkey Cooking from Start to Finish on

by in Holidays, November 16th, 2015

turkey cooking on thanksgiving day
This Thanksgiving, our turkey-day plans will look a lot like yours — we’re putting the bird in the oven in the morning and waiting for it to get golden brown and juicy a few hours later.

And you can watch.

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Beyond the Kids’ Table: How to Involve Kids in Thanksgiving Prep

by in Family, Holidays, November 16th, 2015

Cooking with KidsWe get it, Thanksgiving Day is a busy one — especially if you’re hosting the meal. You have too much to do and not nearly enough help. It’s tempting to just hand over the iPad or park your kids in front of an all-day loop of Frozen to give you the freedom to prep in peace. But Thanksgiving is a family holiday, after all, and there are so many meaningful ways kids can get involved in the meal. Read more

Bobby Flay Calls This Everyday Ingredient “the Key to Thanksgiving”

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 16th, 2015

Bobby FlayThere are myriad things and people without which Thanksgiving would not be complete: the turkey, the potatoes, the pumpkin puree, the gravy and, of course, your family and friends. But according to Bobby Flay, there’s just one ingredient that is “the key to Thanksgiving” — that one must-have product that will help marry the elements of the meal and ensure a successful feast.

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Stuffing vs. Dressing: It Doesn’t Matter, So Long As One Is on Your Thanksgiving Table

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 16th, 2015

Sausage and Herb StuffingCan you really call your stuffing a “stuffing” if it wasn’t cooked inside the turkey? Do New Yorkers make “dressing,” or is that only a Southern dish? How many ingredient mix-ins is too many when it comes to reinventing the stuffing wheel? There are countless debates surrounding this all-important Thanksgiving side dish, but no matter what argument you believe, one thing is certain: A stuffing or a dressing (however you define it) ought to be on your table this turkey day. Check out Food Network’s all-star lineup of the best picks for both seasonal stuffings and dressings.

Sausage and Herb Stuffing
The beauty of Ina Garten’s timeless stuffing is that you don’t need to start prepping it days in advance to dry out the bread. She simply toasts freshly cut cubes for a few minutes to achieve the same effect.

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The Ultimate Thanksgiving Breadbasket: Cornbread, Dinner Rolls and More

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 15th, 2015

dinner rollsWhen preparing for this year’s Thanksgiving, don’t let the breadbasket become an afterthought. As the vehicle for soaking up precious gravy-drenched, cranberry-stained bits of food from your plate, bread is a key player for the big feast. Yeast or no yeast, baking from scratch is easier than you think. But we’ve got a trick for jazzing up frozen dinner rolls, too, just in case.

We’ve rounded up some of our favorite recipes to pass around the table for the big night. Make your own cheesy crescents, Parker House rolls, fluffy biscuits and more. Whatever you decide on, don’t forget to factor in the next day’s leftover turkey sandwich. The best leftovers of the year deserve to be sandwiched between something equally delicious.

Food Network Magazine’s Basic Dinner-Roll Dough

This versatile dough can be transformed into four amazing recipes: sea salt dinner rolls, herbed fan-tans, cranberry knots and three-cheese crescents. Bake them now, then stash them away in the freezer until Nov. 26 (or up to one month). Before serving them with your turkey, thaw them at room temperature for 30 minutes, then reheat in a 375 degree F oven for 10 minutes.

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Get Sauced: Spike Your Cranberry Sauce This Thanksgiving

by in Entertaining, Holidays, Recipes, November 14th, 2015

With everything else crowding the Thanksgiving table, the cranberry sauce usually doesn’t steal the show. We’re changing that up this year with this tipsy recipe that spikes the traditional jellied sauce with vodka. Watch Food Network Kitchen’s video below to see how it’s done, then follow their lead to make your cranberry sauce the most-popular side — or cocktail shooter — of Thanksgiving 2015. It may well become a new tradition. Just be sure to keep it away from the kids’ table, because it looks just like its nonalcoholic cousin!

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Sunny Anderson’s Canned Cranberry Thanksgiving Hack

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 14th, 2015

Sunny AndersonThe centerpiece roast turkey, the spread of casseroles, the pumpkin pie (and, likely, the apple pie too) — there’s no shortage of to-dos come Thanksgiving. So when there’s an opportunity to make your prep work a tad easier, it’s indeed tempting to give in. Hear from The Kitchen‘s Sunny Anderson about how she transforms a tried-and-true store-bought staple — the infamous canned cranberries — into an all-new side dish.

According to Sunny, one of her go-to holiday hacks is “cranberry sauce out of the can.” But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t dress it up. When it comes to the jellied stuff and the whole-cranberry option, she explains: “You can mix it together. … I take the jelly. I don’t slice it; that looks crazy. You just beat it with a whisk until it becomes a little bit loose, and then you add in the [canned whole cranberries].” To add an extra boost of homemade flavor, she brightens up the sauce with citrus. “A little bit of orange juice, some orange rind or, you know, zested. It kind of feels like it’s your own,” she explains. She also adds that you can mix in chopped fresh rosemary. “It looks like you made it, but you didn’t,” says Sunny.

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