All Posts In Food Network Magazine

Good Cover: Try Cheese on Your Pie

by in Food Network Magazine, September 27th, 2013

cheese on pieApple pie and cheddar cheese have been paired up forever, but we’re not entirely sure why cheddar has been the exclusive partner. Apple pie tastes great with almost any cheese melted on top — it’s like a cheese course and dessert in one. Try one of the types shown here: Just put a thin slice on a piece of pie and melt in the microwave or under the broiler.

Clockwise from bottom left: Blue Cheese, caraway Havarti, Gruyere, brie and aged Gouda

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Pre-Crack Your Eggs

by in Food Network Magazine, September 24th, 2013

cracked egg

When frying eggs, crack them one at a time into a cup or small bowl — not directly into the pan. If the yolk breaks, you can save that egg for another dish. We pre-crack eggs for cookies and cakes, too, so we can pick out any bits of shell before they end up in the batter.

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, September 21st, 2013

October cover

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the October issue of Food Network Magazine.

Ree, your ranch is pretty remote. How often do you go to the store and how do you plan your meals for the week?
Matt Pelis from Shelburne Falls, Mass.

We have a small grocery store in our town where I can get lots of essentials. I don’t plan my meals by the week at all. Instead, I just make sure to have plenty of staples on hand: meats, pastas, beans, canned tomato products, onions, potatoes, carrots and rice. I can whip up most things I need with these basics. When my husband or I pass through town, we’ll grab lettuce and other shorter-lived products. And when I’m in the big city, I get things I can’t get locally, like jarred pesto, great sauces and relishes.
Ree Drummond

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Mix Your Apples

by in Food Network Magazine, September 17th, 2013

applesNext time you shop for apples, pick up a few varieties and combine them in recipes. Try tart (Granny Smith or Cortland) with sweet (Pink Lady or Macoun), and mix textures too: Empire and McIntosh soften when they’re cooked; Golden Delicious and Honeycrisp retain their shape. Just avoid Red Delicious — they get too mushy.

Tour Nadia G.’s Kitchen

by in Food Network Magazine, September 14th, 2013

Nadia G's kitchen

Check out Nadia G.’s Montreal kitchen, then pick up some of her finds for your own kitchen.

black goblets

 

 

 

Black goblets appeal to Nadia’s dark side. $16, Mario Luca Giusti; seed387.com

brasserie plates

 

 

Nadia’s Brasserie Plates are modeled after those used in restaurants in France during the 1920s. $33 for a 9½-inch plate, Pillivuyt USA; 125west.com

 

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July/August’s Name This Dish Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, September 10th, 2013

name this dish fried chicken

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include a frozen drink (winning name: “Gulp of Mexico“), fried ice cream (“Fryer and Ice“) and even corn-crab deviled eggs (“Fish and Chicks“). In the July/August 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this coconut fried chicken (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Currybian Chicken
Jeanette Vilches
La Puente, Calif.

Polynesian Drums
Chris Davis
Jackson, Tenn.

More favorites and the winner announced

Pound Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, September 9th, 2013

pork scallopini saladFor a super fast dinner, pound your meat before grilling or sauteing it: Thinner pieces cook quickly (check out Food Network Magazine‘s Pork Scallopini Salad). Pounding also breaks up the connective tissue in tougher cuts, making them more tender. Place the meat between pieces of plastic wrap, and pound to an even thickness with the flat side of a meat mallet, a rolling pinor a small heavy skillet.

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, September 6th, 2013

September 2013 Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the September 2013 issue of Food Network Magazine.

Giada, your daughter, Jade, has such a mature palate. As the mother of an 8-month-old, I wonder if you have any advice to ensure my child will like different cuisines and not just kid stuff.
Ann Kording from Woodbridge, Va.

You can’t feed her kid stuff. As soon as she starts eating solids, you need to make her real food. Eight months is a little young because there are a lot of things she can’t eat yet, but as soon as possible she needs to eat what you eat. I grew up eating adult food with my parents, and Jade eats what we eat, too.
Giada De Laurentiis

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Skim, Skim, Skim

by in Food Network Magazine, September 4th, 2013

ladleIf you’re making a sauce, soup or stew with meat, a layer of fat will probably appear on the surface. To remove it, position your pot halfway off the burner: The fat will migrate to the cooler side. Then gently lower a ladle onto the surface of the fat (try not to disturb the surface too much or you’ll stir the fat back in). Better yet, if you have time, chill the dish: The fat will congeal and you can scoop it off.

Fun Cooking: Breakfast Break

by in Food Network Magazine, September 2nd, 2013

Cereal BrittlePop quiz: How many boxes of cereal are in your pantry? Assuming that you’re sitting on a surplus like most families, we have just the recipe for you: cereal brittle. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and brush with vegetable oil. In a saucepan, combine 2 tablespoons water and 1 cup sugar. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; cook, swirling the pan but not stirring, until amber, 6 to 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in 1 cup cereal (we used a mix of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Kix and Cheerios); pour onto the prepared baking sheet and spread with a rubber spatula. Let cool completely, then break into pieces.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

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