All Posts In Food Network Magazine

Give Rice a Rest

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, August 14th, 2012

Bacon and Broccoli Rice Bowl
Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To get fluffy, evenly cooked rice, ignore it for 5 to 10 minutes after it’s done cooking and keep the lid on while it sits. (Do not stir.) The rice will continue absorbing moisture from the steam in the pot even after all of the water is gone. If the rice is still a tad undercooked after resting, sprinkle it with hot tap water, cover and set aside until the water is absorbed.

Try a T-Bone Pork Chop

by in Food Network Magazine, August 9th, 2012

T-Bone Pork Chop

The T-bone pork chop is the perfect cut for grilling. Also called the “center cut” or “pork loin chop,” it’s immediately recognizable by the T-shaped bone running through it — much like the beefsteak of the same name. It’s mostly juicy loin meat, with a little bit of lean but tender tenderloin meat, and a nice amount of fat to impart lots of moisture and flavor. But the most important component is the bone itself, which does a lot to keep the chop from drying out as it cooks.

When you brine these chops, you end up with an even juicier cut. The chops in Food Network Magazine’s Grilled Pork Chops With Plum Ginger Chutney (pictured above) are brined in a mixture of water, sugar, salt, gin, vermouth and various spices. The botanical flavors of the booze really complement both the pork and the plum chutney. For your next barbecue, leave the boneless cuts at the store and try the T-bone instead. We promise you’ll be licking your chops.

Try our Farmers’ Market Menu

Just the Facts: Cherries

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, August 9th, 2012

Cherries
Bing CherriesBing Cherries

Most of the sweet cherries grown in the United States are this large wine-colored variety. Their intense flavor and firm, crisp texture make them the ultimate all-purpose cherry, great for snacking or baking. They’re usually available from May to August.

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June’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, August 7th, 2012

Hot Dog Sandwich
Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include bite-sized cakes (winning name: “Swirly Temples”), crab-stuffed mushrooms (“Surf ‘N Earth”) and even an egg tart (“Breakfast in Bread”). In the June 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this hot dog sandwich (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Pigs in a Bunk Bed
Milagros Swerdlow
New Wilmington, Pa.

Piggyback Stack
Dave DeSario
Brightwaters, N.Y.

More favorites and the winner announced

50 States, 50 Sandwiches

by in Food Network Magazine, August 7th, 2012

Kentucky sandwich
Sliced bread is the measure against which we judge all the best things in life because without it we wouldn’t have one of the most ingenious food inventions of all time: the sandwich. Starting six months ago, we scoured America for the country’s most delicious sandwiches and we learned two things: One, you can put pretty much anything between two slices of bread, and two, almost everything tastes better that way. We considered sandwiches of all kinds — hot, cold, round, square, tall, pressed, wrapped, meaty, cheesy — and narrowed down our list of favorites to the single must-try sandwich in each state. Catch some of the best on Cooking Channel August 19 at 8pm, then get out there and try them!

Find your state’s sandwich: 50 States, 50 Sandwiches

The Great American Sandwich Poll results are in

Break the Mold: Gelatin Watermelon

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, August 6th, 2012

Watermelon Gelatin
Each month, Food Network Kitchens chefs put more than 100 recipes to the test for Food Network Magazine. Dreaming up gelatin desserts for the July/August issue proved no easy feat: We wanted the bites to be fresh and elegant, yet whimsical and maybe a tiny bit kitschy (a concept we jokingly referred to as “jell-egance”).

The gelatin squares on page 90 of the July/August issue have a sleek modernist edge, but they originally started as a kid-friendly trompe l’oeil dessert (pictured above). We used the rind of a sugar baby and mini chocolate chips to give them their fun watermelon look.

Re-create it at home by pouring and setting the watermelon gelatin mixture in the hollowed-out half of a sugar baby watermelon. Make sure it’s completely set before cutting it, then apply the chocolate chips just before serving so they don’t turn to mush.

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Take the Right Temperature

by in Food Network Magazine, August 4th, 2012

meat thermometerHot Tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To check a steak for doneness, insert a thermometer into the side, not the top. Aim the tip of the thermometer toward the center of the meat: You’ll get a more precise reading there than from the hotter areas near the surface. Move the steak to the edge of the grill before taking the temperature to prevent overcooking.

 

(Photograph by Antonis Achilleos)

Jose Garces’ Top 5 Places to Eat in Philly

by in Food Network Magazine, August 3rd, 2012

Jose Garces

We can’t fault Jose Garces for choosing one of his own restaurants as a top spot in Philadelphia: The guy has opened seven places there in the past six years. But after living in the city for 11 years, he knows some other great finds, too. Here are his top picks:

Middle Eastern ComboMiddle Eastern Combo from the Sahara Grill

When Jose is really hungry, he goes to this no-frills Lebanese restaurant. It’s small, he says, but the platters aren’t. The Middle Eastern combo includes hummus, baba ghanoush, marinated carrots and mushrooms, tabouli, eggplant salad, feta and olives. “It’s enough for four people,” he says. $11 for lunch, $12 for dinner; 1334 Walnut St.; 215-985-4155

Jose’s top four places to eat

Give Pasta a Whirl

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, August 1st, 2012

Broken Lasagna Tomato and Zucchini Pasta

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

As soon as you add pasta to boiling water, stir it vigorously for about 5 seconds to keep it from sticking, like Food Network Magazine did with the Broken Lasagna With Zucchini-Tomato Sauce. Each piece should be able to tumble freely in the pot. Don’t add oil to the water as is often suggested: It can prevent sauce from clinging to cooked pasta.

Cold War: Austin Ice Cream Festival

by in Food Network Magazine, July 31st, 2012

Austin Ice Cream Festival

The average high in Austin this time of year is 97 degrees, so it’s no wonder the city’s ice cream festival was an instant hit when it started in 2007. Nearly 12,000 people showed up that summer, and now the all-day event (taking place August 4, $10; www.icecreamfestival.org) is an annual affair, with an ice cream eating contest, Popsicle-stick sculpting and, most important, an ice cream making competition. It’s an intense battle: Contestants have to bring their own machine and churn out their creation on-site for a panel of four locals and four discerning kids. We asked champions from past festivals to hand over their winning recipes.

Get the winning recipes

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