All Posts In Food Network Magazine

October’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

Autumn Wrap
Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include tricolor potatoes (winning name: “United Tates of America”), a hot dog sandwich (“Triple Dog Dare”) and even a portable treat (“Berried Treasure”). In the October 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this autumn wrap (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Fall Tied Up!
Caitlin Dowswell
Vallejo, Calif.

Fall Foldiage
Michelle Burwell
Desert Hills, Ariz.

More favorites and the winner announced

The Ultimate Thanksgiving Cake

by in Food Network Magazine, Holidays, November 18th, 2012

Pumpkin Pie Pecan Cake
Having a hard time deciding what pie to make for Thanksgiving dessert? Take a departure from the traditional and try Food Network Magazine’s Pumpkin Spice Cake With Chocolate-Pecan Filling from page 112 of the November issue (pictured above). We took our favorite parts of pumpkin, pecan and chocolate pies and layered them together to make this centerpiece cake.

Not a chocoholic? Skip the chocolate glaze and opt for this easy pumpkin cream cheese frosting instead:

Beat together 1 pound room temperature cream cheese, 1 stick room temperature unsalted butter, 1/3 cup pumpkin purée, 1/4 cup carrot baby food, 1 teaspoon each vanilla extract and orange zest, and 1/4 teaspoon each ground cinnamon and freshly grated nutmeg on medium-high in a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or a large bowl if using a hand mixer) until very smooth, about 2 minutes. Adjust the speed to low and add 4 cups of confectioners’ sugar, in batches, until the frosting is smooth. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before frosting your cake. (Cake can be frosted and refrigerated up to 2 hours before serving.) Enjoy!

Behind the Booklet: 50 Things to Make With Apples

by in Food Network Magazine, November 16th, 2012

50 Things to Make With ApplesWhen the Food Network test kitchens first conceived of the “50 Things to Make With Apples” booklet from the October issue of Food Network Magazine (page 160), we thought we would use apple in all its forms, including applesauce and cider.

Ultimately, we decided to only include recipes with fresh apples — but I had already developed this easy recipe for cider-glazed bacon. You’ll be amazed by how much of the cider flavor actually comes through. And if you want to take it over the top, use the bacon to make a BLA — a BLT with sliced apples instead of tomatoes.

Simmer 1 cup apple cider down to 1/4 cup, about 15 minutes. Lay 1/2 pound thick-cut bacon on a rack on sheet tray; brush with half the cider; bake at 350 degrees F for 30 minutes, flipping and brushing again halfway through.

Join the Sweet Potato Craze

by in Food Network Magazine, November 15th, 2012

Sweet Potatoes

America’s obsession with sweets isn’t always a bad thing. We’re eating more vitamin-packed sweet potatoes than ever: about seven pounds a year per person, up from only 3.8 pounds in 2002. It helps that fast-food restaurants, including Wendy’s and Burger King, have put them on the menu. And celebrities are touting them, too: Oprah Winfrey says they’re one of her favorite foods, and Glee‘s Matthew Morrison follows a sweet potato-only diet before photo shoots. Get your fill with Guy Fieri’s Whiskey-Glazed Sweet Potatoes and Ree Drummond’s Soul Sweet ‘Taters, then vote for your favorite.

Press Your Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, November 13th, 2012

Steak on cutting board

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Next time you cook a steak on the stovetop, place a cast-iron skillet or other heavy pan on top of the meat while it’s cooking. The extra weight will prevent the steak from curling around the edges and help give it an even sear. If you don’t have a heavy pan, you can use a regular one and weigh it down with a few cans of tomatoes or beans.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Pan-Fried Sweet Plantains

by in Food Network Magazine, November 10th, 2012

Sweet Plantains with Cilantro Rice
In the Mexican Fish Supper weekend dinner from Food Network Magazine’s October issue (page 132), I created a recipe for a quick Cilantro Rice with Sweet Plantains (pictured above). To make things even easier, I call for frozen fried sweet plantains. They aren’t quite as good as homemade, but they’re pretty good and very easy to prepare.

If you have a little more time and a few plantains on hand, make your own. Make sure your plantains are extremely ripe — even bordering on mushy. If they’re not, the results will not be as yummy or gooey as you really want them to be because the natural sugars inside the plantain haven’t fully developed.

Keep reading for the recipe

Learn to Love It: Cauliflower

by in Food Network Magazine, November 9th, 2012

Twice-Baked Potatoes with Cauliflower
We’re big cauliflower lovers in the Food Network test kitchen, but we understand not everyone shares our enthusiasm. To recruit more fans for our cruciferous friend, we steamed and pureed it for the Super-Stuffed Baked Potatoes on page 70 of Food Network Magazine’s October issue. We didn’t have to use sour cream because of the creaminess of the cauliflower. Plus, it added fiber, calcium and vitamin C. We also turned to cauliflower to replace the meat in the Spicy Vegetarian Chili from the magazine’s January/February 2012 issue, page 106: We coarsely grated it raw and stirred it in at the end. Use pureed cauliflower to thicken soups, or add it to a dip to replace some of the fat.

How to Bake a Better Potato

by in Food Network Magazine, November 6th, 2012

steak and blue cheese potatoes

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To improve your baked potatoes inside and out, brush the skin with olive oil or melted butter before baking; it’ll crisp the skin. And don’t wrap potatoes in foil — just prick them all over with a fork (to help steam escape) and bake at 375 degrees F until tender, about 50 minutes. To speed up the cooking process, start the potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes, then brush with oil and finish in the oven for 10 minutes, like we did for the Steak With Blue Cheese Potatoes recipe pictured above.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

The Risotto Challenge: Traditional vs. Quick and Under Pressure

by in Food Network Magazine, November 1st, 2012

Mushroom and Squash RisottoRisotto is perfect for a special weekend dinner. Until I started working in the test kitchen here at Food Network, I would have never attempted it for a weeknight dinner. That was until Katherine Alford (Vice President Food Network Test Kitchens) introduced me to risotto made in a pressure cooker.

I was skeptical at first. Using a pressure cooker cuts out one of the most important steps: stirring and slowly adding hot stock, coaxing the starch out from rice to make a creamy, luscious risotto. But I gave the pressure cooker a try one Monday night and had risotto ready for dinner in 25 minutes. It wasn’t far off from its traditional counterpart: creamy, toothsome and took only a fraction of the time and effort. Here is how a pressure cooker works: The steam given off by liquids in a well-sealed pressure cooker is trapped, and as pressure builds the temperature rises significantly compared to normal stove-top cooking. These higher temperatures cook food evenly and quickly.

Tip: Be sure to read your manufacturer’s instructions before using your pressure cooker for the first time.

Keep reading

Mix Up Your Onions

by in Food Network Magazine, October 29th, 2012

Shallot

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Keep red onions on hand: They’re milder than yellow or white ones, so you can eat them raw. Plus, you can substitute them for shallots in most recipes, like the vodka sauce in this Penne With Vodka Sauce recipe. Use 1/2 small red onion for every large shallot.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

...10...161718...20...