All Posts In Food Network Magazine

March’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, April 16th, 2013

Cheese FriesEach month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include a stuffed cupcake (winning name: “Heart of the Batter“), a cheese puff tower (“Mount Chevrest“) and even a stuffed popover (“Puddin’ Pops“). In the March 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for these cheese fries (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Web of Fries
Amy Wojcik
Clearwater, Fla.

Starch Madness
Ashley Denton
Camden, S.C.

More favorites and the winner announced

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, April 11th, 2013

Food Network Magazine April Cover

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the April issue of Food Network Magazine:

Justin, how would you describe your relationship with Alton? You two are definitely Food Network’s outside-the-box father-son dream team.
Amanda Bisesi via Facebook

I lost my father when I was in my teens, and as a young man I haven’t had the “paternal push” to get things done. I’ve just done things on my own — most of the time resulting in success. But now there is someone who I can bounce ideas off of as I continue to grow into my new role as TV-food-guru-outside-the-boxer.
— Justin Warner

Keep reading

Design a Spread

by in Food Network Magazine, April 10th, 2013

Ham and Goat Cheese SandwichesCombine a soft cheese, like goat cheese or ricotta, with chopped nuts, seeds, dried fruit, grated garlic or a favorite condiment to make a quick sandwich spread. (Food Network Magazine mixed goat cheese with hot sauce and pepitas for the Ham and Goat Cheese Sandwich pictured above.) You can also use the spread on crostini, or dollop it onto hot pasta for a fun, fast dinner.

How to Make Herbed Breadsticks

by in Food Network Magazine, April 8th, 2013

Herbed BreadsticksGive your breadsticks a fresh look for spring. Arrange refrigerated breadstick dough on a baking sheet and brush with a beaten egg. Place small, delicate herb leaves like dill, chervil, oregano or parsley on top, then brush with more of the egg and bake as directed.

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)

Improve Your Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, April 3rd, 2013

SauceSwirl a few tablespoons of cold butter into a pan sauce before you serve it — you’ll be amazed by how it improves the texture. Cut the butter into small pieces and whisk them in a few at a time, then remove the sauce from the heat and cover to keep warm. If the sauce gets too hot, the butter can separate and make the sauce oily. If this happens, just whisk in a few tablespoons of water.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Yolk’s on You

by in Food Network Magazine, April 1st, 2013

April Fool's Joke

Folks in San Antonio love a good April Fools’ joke. A signature dish at the A Night in Old San Antonio street fair is a “shypoke egg”: a tostada topped with circles of melted white and yellow American cheese (a jalapeno slice highlights the “yolk”). The sunny-side-up look-alike was invented at Hipp’s Bubble Room, and though the restaurant closed in 1980, event organizers still make the “eggs” from the original recipe. Try some at the festival, which kicks off April 23 (admission from $10; niosa.org). Or take a crack at them yourself.

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)

Bean Count: The Great Jelly Bean Debate

by in Food Network Magazine, March 31st, 2013

Jelly Beans

We didn’t need a massive Twitter poll to prove that black jelly beans are the black sheep of Easter candy: We’ve all seen those piles of uneaten ones left at the bottom of the bag. But we asked the question anyway, and sure enough, 65 percent of respondents said they leave the black ones behind. If you’re wondering why jelly bean makers don’t just eliminate them, executives at Brach’s say that the black beans are actually more of a hit than any other color. “People who love them really love them,” says company spokesman Hans Becher. How much? It’s the only flavor they sell by the whole bag.

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)

Just the Facts: Melting

by in Food Network Magazine, March 28th, 2013

Melting Guide

Stretchy Melters
Instead of oozing, these get stringy and elastic when melted — good for when you want the cheese to stay put, like on pizza.
Stretchy Cheese Melters

Find out which cheeses are creamy and are non-melters

Know Your Conversions

by in Food Network Magazine, March 26th, 2013

measuring cup

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

When a recipe calls for grated cheese, you might not always know how big a block you should buy. The texture of the cheese makes all the difference, but as a general rule, 3 to 4 ounces whole yields 1 cup grated. To measure grated cheese, put it in a dry measuring cup and tap it against the counter; don’t pack it firmly.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D)

Speed Up a Roast Chicken

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, March 25th, 2013

Roast Chicken With Apple SlawHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

For a fast weeknight meal, roast two half chickens instead of one whole bird. It takes just 35 minutes (see Food Network Magazine‘s Roast Chicken With Apple Slaw, pictured above). Use a rimmed baking sheet instead of a deep roasting pan (the short sides help the heat circulate evenly). And choose the convection setting on your oven if you have one: You’ll get crisp, golden skin in a hurry.

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