All Posts In Food Network Magazine

Grate Your Garlic

by in Food Network Magazine, June 18th, 2013

grated garlicHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

If you’re using raw garlic in a dish, grate the cloves on a fine grater. It’s much faster than mincing, and you’ll end up with a mix of garlic juice and tiny bits of the clove that distribute evenly in salsas, dressings and other uncooked dishes. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about biting into a big chunk.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

How to Make Sangria Floats

by in Food Network Magazine, June 13th, 2013

Sangria Floats

Try a new take on sangria this summer: sparkling red wine poured over fruit sorbet. You can prepare it in about 30 seconds — no fruit chopping required. For these, we paired lambrusco (sparkling Italian red wine) with scoops of lemon, peach and orange sorbets. Try your own flavor combo or just drink the lambrusco by itself: It’s the perfect wine for a cookout.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Fire Up the Broiler

by in Food Network Magazine, June 11th, 2013

Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream SauceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Broiling is a great hands-off way to cook fish: You’ll get a nice caramelized crust on top, and you won’t need to flip the fillets. (Check out Food Network Magazine‘s Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream Sauce, pictured above.) Be sure to preheat the broiler first, then cook the fish for six to eight minutes per inch of thickness. If you line the pan with foil, cleanup is super easy.

How to Use Fish Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, June 8th, 2013

Rice Noodle and Shrimp Salad Recipe

In Food Network Magazine, we occasionally make Southeast Asian-inspired recipes that call for fish sauce, like the Rice Noodle-Shrimp Salad (pictured above) in our June issue. This sauce is a staple of Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam and really the entire region, and is usually made from fermented anchovies. Sounds scary, we know, and it can smell scary, too — very pungent. But it can be surprisingly subtle and can add an astounding depth of flavor as well as authenticity to a dish. We’re lucky that we can now find fish sauce in the Asian section of most big grocery stores. But if you are lucky enough to live near an Asian market, you will likely see several different brands on the shelf, each of different origins and with its own subtly unique flavor.

In November of last year, right before we started developing our recipes for June, I had the good fortune of visiting Vietnam. The food, of course, was amazing. And while there, I was surprised to learn about the variety of fish sauces and fish sauce blends they used. The most common variety by far is nuoc cham: fish sauce diluted with water, sugar and lime juice, usually seasoned with garlic and fresh chilies. Not only is it delicious, but because its flavor is slightly more subdued, it is the perfect starting point for fish sauce novices. In the Rice Noodle-Shrimp Salad, I created my own version of nuoc cham as the salad dressing. It imparts tons of flavor to the rice noodles, but it’s also extremely versatile: It’s great as a dipping sauce for grilled chicken, for instance.

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You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, June 5th, 2013

May issue of Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions from the May issue of Food Network Magazine.

Guy, recipes often ask for different kinds of mustard — dry, ground, yellow. Does it really matter which I use?
Anja Martin from Thrall, Texas

Yes, it does matter. The reason has to do with intensity. It’s best to use the one the recipe calls for the first time around and then take the liberty to tweak to your taste after. For me, the hotter the mustard, the better!
— Guy Fieri

Sunny, some men hate it when their significant others pick food off their plates — and my man is no exception. But for some reason, there is always a bite on his plate that calls my name. How do I take it off his plate without irritating him?
Kathleen Sebastian from Richmond, Calif.

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Buy Frozen Brown Rice

by in Food Network Magazine, June 4th, 2013

frozen brown riceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

One of our favorite new supermarket finds is frozen brown rice. It’s fully cooked and ready to use: You can add it straight from the freezer to soups, stews and stir-fries and saving about 45 minutes of cooking time.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

Behind the Booklet: 50 Slaws

by in Food Network Magazine, June 1st, 2013

Classic Slaw Recipe
Slaws are the ultimate summer salad: They are fresh and crisp, can be prepared hours in advance and make the perfect companion to grilled foods. In Food Network Magazine‘s June booklet, you get 50 awesome slaws to fulfill all your summer needs. But because we here in the Test Kitchen have too many ideas for our own good, we had a few slaw recipes left over that just couldn’t fit into the booklet. One of them is particularly special because of its longevity: It’s delicious in the summer, but transitions wonderfully into the cooler months. The combination of pear, endive, red cabbage, maple, cranberries and pecans will feel as at home on your Labor Day table as it will in your Thanksgiving spread.

Pear Endive Slaw With Maple Dressing: Combine (4-5 cups) 1/2 head thinly sliced red cabbage with 1 tablespoon kosher salt for 1 hour. Rinse well and pat dry. Whisk 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar, 3 tablespoons maple syrup; add 1/4 cup oil. Toss on cabbage with 3 sliced endives, 2 sliced pears, and 1/2 cup each dried cranberries and toasted chopped pecans.

Get the Look: Sunny Anderson’s Kitchen

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, May 30th, 2013

sunny anderson's kitchen

Pick up some of Sunny’s finds for your own kitchen.

Monstera Leaf Garden Towels
Because she has several cats who like to paw at the curtains, Sunny made hers out of this extra-sturdy barkcloth fabric, in the Monstera Leaf Garden pattern. $17 per yard; islandshawaiianfabric.com

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Use Up Those Buns

by in Food Network Magazine, May 28th, 2013

pesto chicken burgersHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Don’t let extra burger buns go to waste: Use them as a binder for chicken or veggie burgers, meatloaf or meatballs. For Food Network Magazine‘s Pesto Chicken Burgers (pictured above), we tore up a bun and mixed it with water to make a panade, a mixture of liquid and starch that holds ingredients together. Use this trick for any recipe that calls for breadcrumbs as a binder.

Fun Cooking: A Creative Way to Serve Condiments

by in Entertaining, Food Network Magazine, May 27th, 2013

Condiment Paint cans

We think this cookout idea is a stroke of genius. Serve condiments in new mini paint pails (foodsafe), with pastry brushes for spreading (pails, $4 each, containerstore.com; brushes, $3 each, norprowebstore.com). The brushes give you better coverage than a typical squeeze bottle — all the more reason to step up your condiments, too: Try our homemade ketchup.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

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