All Posts In Food Network Magazine

Poach Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, July 9th, 2013

poached chickenMake your own flavorful broth for poaching chicken or fish by adding vegetables and herbs to simmering water. It’s called a court-bouillon (or “short broth”), and you can customize it with your favorite flavors (we used garlic, scallions and fennel fronds for Food Network Magazine‘s Poached Chicken with Garlic-Herb Sauce, pictured above). Don’t throw out the liquid when you’re done poaching: Store it in the fridge and use it like regular chicken broth.

Grill Veggies Right

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, July 2nd, 2013

veggies on a cutting boardYou don’t need a special basket to grill vegetables. Just slice them on the bias to expose more surface area — this prevents pieces of skinny vegetables like zucchini or yellow squash from falling through the grate, and it lets more of the vegetable come in contact with both your marinade and the grill.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

A Shandy Shore Dinner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 27th, 2013

Beer-Braised Ribs With ClamsBeer is a refreshing beverage during the warm summer months, and it’s also great to cook with and marinate meats in. The beer used in Food Network Magazine‘s Beer-Braised Ribs with Clams dinner (pictured above) is not only a great way to season ribs — it’s also perfect for a refreshing Lemon Shandy. It’s easy: Just mix equal parts beer and lemonade and serve over ice. Add a splash of ginger ale if you’d like. It’s the perfect drink to sip as you pile up all those bones and shells!

Make this easy menu for dinner tonight:

May’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 25th, 2013

name this dish frozen drink

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include corn-crab deviled eggs (winning name: “Fish and Chicks“), cheese fries (“The Smotherload“) and even a stuffed cupcake (“Heart of the Batter“). In the May 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this frozen drink (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Margajito
Nancy Boardman
Naples, Fla.

Borderlime
Mary Argyros
St. Louis

More favorites and the winner announced

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, June 21st, 2013

Food Network Magazine June Cover
Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the June issue of Food Network Magazine.

Ree, what meals do you regularly cook ahead — or double and then freeze?
Brenda Erwin from Hurst, Texas

My Chicken Spaghetti recipe is definitely one of those casseroles I tend to double — and often triple — so I can have extra pans for the fridge. Lasagna is another one: If I’m going to cook up a big meat sauce and boil noodles, I might as well make twice the amount. The mess isn’t that much bigger and I get more bang for my buck. Some other things I love to freeze: sloppy joe mix, spaghetti sauce, taco meat and even pulled pork or beef brisket. If you wrap them carefully, they’ll do just fine in the freezer.
Ree Drummond

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Grate Your Garlic

by in Food Network Magazine, June 18th, 2013

grated garlicHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

If you’re using raw garlic in a dish, grate the cloves on a fine grater. It’s much faster than mincing, and you’ll end up with a mix of garlic juice and tiny bits of the clove that distribute evenly in salsas, dressings and other uncooked dishes. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about biting into a big chunk.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

How to Make Sangria Floats

by in Food Network Magazine, June 13th, 2013

Sangria Floats

Try a new take on sangria this summer: sparkling red wine poured over fruit sorbet. You can prepare it in about 30 seconds — no fruit chopping required. For these, we paired lambrusco (sparkling Italian red wine) with scoops of lemon, peach and orange sorbets. Try your own flavor combo or just drink the lambrusco by itself: It’s the perfect wine for a cookout.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Fire Up the Broiler

by in Food Network Magazine, June 11th, 2013

Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream SauceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Broiling is a great hands-off way to cook fish: You’ll get a nice caramelized crust on top, and you won’t need to flip the fillets. (Check out Food Network Magazine‘s Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream Sauce, pictured above.) Be sure to preheat the broiler first, then cook the fish for six to eight minutes per inch of thickness. If you line the pan with foil, cleanup is super easy.

How to Use Fish Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, June 8th, 2013

Rice Noodle and Shrimp Salad Recipe

In Food Network Magazine, we occasionally make Southeast Asian-inspired recipes that call for fish sauce, like the Rice Noodle-Shrimp Salad (pictured above) in our June issue. This sauce is a staple of Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam and really the entire region, and is usually made from fermented anchovies. Sounds scary, we know, and it can smell scary, too — very pungent. But it can be surprisingly subtle and can add an astounding depth of flavor as well as authenticity to a dish. We’re lucky that we can now find fish sauce in the Asian section of most big grocery stores. But if you are lucky enough to live near an Asian market, you will likely see several different brands on the shelf, each of different origins and with its own subtly unique flavor.

In November of last year, right before we started developing our recipes for June, I had the good fortune of visiting Vietnam. The food, of course, was amazing. And while there, I was surprised to learn about the variety of fish sauces and fish sauce blends they used. The most common variety by far is nuoc cham: fish sauce diluted with water, sugar and lime juice, usually seasoned with garlic and fresh chilies. Not only is it delicious, but because its flavor is slightly more subdued, it is the perfect starting point for fish sauce novices. In the Rice Noodle-Shrimp Salad, I created my own version of nuoc cham as the salad dressing. It imparts tons of flavor to the rice noodles, but it’s also extremely versatile: It’s great as a dipping sauce for grilled chicken, for instance.

Get the recipe

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, June 5th, 2013

May issue of Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions from the May issue of Food Network Magazine.

Guy, recipes often ask for different kinds of mustard — dry, ground, yellow. Does it really matter which I use?
Anja Martin from Thrall, Texas

Yes, it does matter. The reason has to do with intensity. It’s best to use the one the recipe calls for the first time around and then take the liberty to tweak to your taste after. For me, the hotter the mustard, the better!
— Guy Fieri

Sunny, some men hate it when their significant others pick food off their plates — and my man is no exception. But for some reason, there is always a bite on his plate that calls my name. How do I take it off his plate without irritating him?
Kathleen Sebastian from Richmond, Calif.

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