All Posts In Food Network Magazine

Try a New Twist on the Classic BLT

by in Food Network Magazine, July 22nd, 2013

Asian-Style BLTNo one seems to agree on the most important ingredient in a BLT, although we all know it’s not the lettuce. I asked around the kitchen and the results were 50/50: half said the star of the sandwich is the bacon, the other half said tomato.

Luckily, our BLT story in Food Network Magazines July/August issue has something for everyone — bacon lovers, tomato lovers and even a little something for you lettuce-loving outliers. The different types of bacon and bacon seasonings are all great, but as an avid tomato lover, I particularly like the ways the recipe developers handled the tomatoes in their dishes. Whether fresh, oven-dried, made into a salsa or broiled, each style of tomato balanced the other components in the dish perfectly.

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Fire and Ice: How to Make Grilled Lemonade

by in Food Network Magazine, July 18th, 2013

grilled lemonadeWe’re all for throwing new things onto the grill, but we were skeptical of grilled lemonade when we heard about the trend. After trying it, we’re sold: Grilling the lemons makes the drink taste caramelized and slightly smoky. To make a pitcher, dip the cut sides of 16 halved lemons in sugar and grill until marked, about 5 minutes; let cool. Simmer 1 1/4 cups sugar with 1 3/4 cups water and a pinch of salt until dissolved; let cool. Squeeze the lemons through a strainer into a pitcher; stir in the sugar syrup, some ice and a few of the grilled lemons.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Give Fish Sauce a Try

by in Food Network Magazine, July 16th, 2013

fish sauceDon’t be scared off by a recipe that calls for fish sauce. It smells pungent, but you won’t detect any fishiness in your dish — just a rich, salty, almost meaty flavor. Fish sauce can be used in more than just Asian dishes: Add a splash to tomato sauce or whisk some into salad dressing. Just remember that a little goes a long way.

(Photograph by David Turner/Studio D.)

Behind the Booklet: Fresh Corn 50 Ways

by in Food Network Magazine, July 15th, 2013

jerk salted cornWho doesn’t love corn? It’s sweet, crisp, fun to eat and says summer like no other food. We also love corn for its versatility: It’s as delicious boiled as it is grilled, on the cob or off, sauteed or stirred into batters. We created corn recipes of all types for Food Network Magazine‘s July/August booklet, and although I enjoy corn in all its forms, I’m a purist at heart. I like it best simply grilled or boiled, with ample butter and a generous dusting of kosher or sea salt.

When I’m in the mood for a little more pizzazz, I mix up a flavored salt like the jerk or lemon-pepper seasoning in the booklet, both of which are extremely easy to prepare and transform classic corn on the cob into something exceptional. Here are two more recipes for amazing flavored salts. The bacon salt is a perfect complement to grilled corn served alongside burgers and hot dogs; the lemon coriander one tastes great on buttery boiled corn at a clam bake.

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DIY Ice Pops

by in Food Network Magazine, July 11th, 2013

freezie popsAmericans have been squeezing ice pops out of plastic tubes since Fla-Vor-Ice was invented more than 40 years ago. But we had to wait awhile to make them ourselves: For years the sleeves were tricky to find outside the Philippines, where homemade push-up pops are super popular. Now you can get the bags stateside, thanks to an ice-pop fan who recently started importing them. Fill with any fruit juice, tie the top and freeze. $10 for 100; icecandybags.com

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Poach Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, July 9th, 2013

poached chickenMake your own flavorful broth for poaching chicken or fish by adding vegetables and herbs to simmering water. It’s called a court-bouillon (or “short broth”), and you can customize it with your favorite flavors (we used garlic, scallions and fennel fronds for Food Network Magazine‘s Poached Chicken with Garlic-Herb Sauce, pictured above). Don’t throw out the liquid when you’re done poaching: Store it in the fridge and use it like regular chicken broth.

Grill Veggies Right

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, July 2nd, 2013

veggies on a cutting boardYou don’t need a special basket to grill vegetables. Just slice them on the bias to expose more surface area — this prevents pieces of skinny vegetables like zucchini or yellow squash from falling through the grate, and it lets more of the vegetable come in contact with both your marinade and the grill.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

A Shandy Shore Dinner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 27th, 2013

Beer-Braised Ribs With ClamsBeer is a refreshing beverage during the warm summer months, and it’s also great to cook with and marinate meats in. The beer used in Food Network Magazine‘s Beer-Braised Ribs with Clams dinner (pictured above) is not only a great way to season ribs — it’s also perfect for a refreshing Lemon Shandy. It’s easy: Just mix equal parts beer and lemonade and serve over ice. Add a splash of ginger ale if you’d like. It’s the perfect drink to sip as you pile up all those bones and shells!

Make this easy menu for dinner tonight:

May’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 25th, 2013

name this dish frozen drink

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include corn-crab deviled eggs (winning name: “Fish and Chicks“), cheese fries (“The Smotherload“) and even a stuffed cupcake (“Heart of the Batter“). In the May 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this frozen drink (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Margajito
Nancy Boardman
Naples, Fla.

Borderlime
Mary Argyros
St. Louis

More favorites and the winner announced

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, June 21st, 2013

Food Network Magazine June Cover
Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the June issue of Food Network Magazine.

Ree, what meals do you regularly cook ahead — or double and then freeze?
Brenda Erwin from Hurst, Texas

My Chicken Spaghetti recipe is definitely one of those casseroles I tend to double — and often triple — so I can have extra pans for the fridge. Lasagna is another one: If I’m going to cook up a big meat sauce and boil noodles, I might as well make twice the amount. The mess isn’t that much bigger and I get more bang for my buck. Some other things I love to freeze: sloppy joe mix, spaghetti sauce, taco meat and even pulled pork or beef brisket. If you wrap them carefully, they’ll do just fine in the freezer.
Ree Drummond

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