All Posts In Food Network Chef

Guy Talks Celebrity Cook-Off on Twitter and Facebook

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, January 10th, 2012

guy fieri
Two of Food Network’s most popular personalities, Rachael Ray and Guy Fieri, are going head-to-head in a new series, Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off. Both Rachael and Guy serve as coaches and mentors to eight multi-talented celebrities, ranging from an Olympic gold medalist to Grammy-winning artists to a Golden Globe-nominated actor — contestants who are all passionate about food and cooking.

Food Network recently caught up with Guy to talk about the show and Team Guy on Twitter and Facebook.

@Rbrittenham: What are you going to do to make your team stand out? What will set you apart?
GF: I want them to be individually creative and do their best.

@jcaonguyen: Which celebrity had no cooking experience at all prior to being on the show?
GF: All had some sort of experience, but I can’t give away insider info. You’ll be surprised just how strong they really are.

More from Facebook and Twitter »

Alex Serves: New Year’s Eve Cocktails for All

by in Drinks, Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 30th, 2011

New Year's Eve CocktailsThis is a time of the year when my drinking rules and all “house” policies go out the window. I want something new. I will drink a cocktail through the cocktail hour and the dinner party instead of switching to wine. I sip smoky, tabacco-y scotch. I indulge in a snifter of brandy. Sometimes I mix drinks. Here are a few I’m enjoying this year for New Year’s.

Negroni

I really like this flavor — it rides the perfect line between bitter and sweet. It goes well with salty snacks or with a full meal. Make sure everything (including the glasses) are as cold as possible.

Get Alex’s cocktail recipes »

Happy New Year From Bobby Flay

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 28th, 2011

Bobby FlayBobby shares some holiday fun facts and lets us in on his New Year’s resolution:

FN Dish: How can cooks be less stressed during the holidays?
Bobby Flay: Cook from within yourself at your skill level. Don’t try to conquer the world with your holiday meal.

FN Dish: What’s your favorite holiday food memory?
BF: One Christmas morning I tried to find a turkey because the Cornish game hen I had planned to cook had gone badly.

FN Dish: What do you cook just when it’s just you?
BF: Homemade nachos with a white American cheese sauce.

FN Dish: What’s your 2012 New Year’s resolution?
BF: To reopen my restaurant in New York City, Bolo. It’s time. It’s like a broken heart that I need to mend.

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Alex Makes: Chilled Beet Soup for the Holidays

by in Food Network Chef, December 22nd, 2011


This soup is really simple to make. It’s really a matter of cooking the beets and garlic together and allowing the flavors to meld. Once that part is done, it’s simply a matter of adding the tangy element of the creme fraiche and the pleasing crunch of the cucumber. I find a chilled soup so refreshing and wonderful when paired with something like a braised meat. The other great thing is that you can make this entirely in advance and simply ladle it into the bowls when ready. For me, when I’m having people over, I love serving the appetizer effortlessly and getting the main course done. The goal is to make great food but to get out of the kitchen and have fun with my friends.

Get Alex’s Chilled Beet Soup recipe »

Alex’s Little Black Dress Cookie Recipe — It’s Good for Everything

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 15th, 2011


I grew up in a house where holiday cookie baking would always reach a fever pitch and the result is this recipe. Why? It is a butter cookie, somewhat crumbly (and grumpy if you’re not nice to it) with the simple taste of clove added. So tasty and they go great with eggnog. The powdered sugar on the exterior is very “retro” and leaves you licking your fingers as you reach for another cookie. Want a plain butter cookie? Omit the cloves. Want to make a chocolate cookie? Make the chocolate ganache at the bottom and serve it warm, on the side, for dunking or dip the cookies once they’re baked and cooled in the chocolate and put them on a rack to set slightly before serving. The melted candy cane in the chocolate adds a fun peppermint touch, but you can also leave it out and just have the flavors of chocolate and butter speak for themselves.

Get the recipe »

Bobby Flay’s 7 Holiday Favorites

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 15th, 2011

Bobby Flay
Bobby Flay took a break from cooking for “Savor Borgata: A Taste of American Classics” at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, N.J. to chat with us about his holiday plans. We asked him seven rapid-fire questions to help us get to know his holiday personality.

FN Dish: For a holiday drink, eggnog, apple cider or hot chocolate?
Bobby Flay: Hot chocolate

FN Dish: Vodka, tequila, gin or bourbon?
BF: Bourbon

FN Dish: Christmas breakfast or Christmas dinner?
BF: Breakfast

Does Bobby eat fruitcake? »

Cooking Tips From Bobby Flay

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, December 8th, 2011

bobby flay cooking demo
At a recent cooking demonstration at Bobby Flay’s namesake steakhouse, located at The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, N.J., Chef Flay not only cooked up delicious shrimp and grits, he also shared some great cooking tips that you’ll want to keep handy this holiday season.

Serving grits:
Grits are basically the American version of polenta, but instead of costing a few bucks, Italian restaurants can charge $32 a plate. Make grits or polenta for the holidays: Take ¼ of the polenta you are going to make and toast it dry in a pan. This will give your polenta a nice nutty flavor and it will separate your polenta from everyone else’s. Try this trick with Bobby’s Shrimp and Grits from Bar Americain, for polenta are sure to impress.

Cook with two oils and more tips »

Spa Treatments for Kohlrabi

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, December 6th, 2011

kohlrabi
Kohlrabi comes from the German words “kohl” (cabbage) and “rabi” (turnip). It tastes like a slightly peppery mixture of turnip and radish with a pinch of Brussels sprout. The bulbs are at their best when they’re around the size of a baseball or softball. If much bigger, they tend to have a tougher texture. I found that both light green and purple kohlrabi don’t taste dramatically different. Maybe the purple was a touch sweeter? You be the judge. How do you eat it?

Raw: The simplest choice. Simply peel the outer layer of skin off with a vegetable peeler and grate the kohlrabi raw over a salad.

Get my dressing recipe for a crisp kohlrabi salad »

Alex Makes: Indian Pudding

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, November 29th, 2011

alex guarnaschelli
This is a classic New England dessert my mother would make during the fall months. She would always make it in a deep, small dish, but I like a shallow (about 2-2 1/2 quart capacity) baking dish. The caramelized apples give the dessert a lighter, fruitier touch. I chose some of my favorite apple varieties for their flavor and ability to hold their shape while cooking. At my local farmers’ market, the guys always have great apple suggestions, and every season I like to pick a new apple variety and make it my “apple of the season.” Last year, I got stuck on the Mutsu for its tart, but also somewhat sweet-when-cooked flavor and crisp texture. This year, I am in search of the perfect cooking apple. What would that entail? An apple that would hold its shape when cooked and also retain a lot of flavor. Not an easy task. I am currently experimenting with Braeburn and Empire apples.

Get the recipe for Indian Pudding »

Alton Brown Talks Turkey Day and His 5-Star Turkey Recipe

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 15th, 2011


Just in time for Thanksgiving, we caught up with Alton Brown and chatted about his plans for the upcoming food-focused holiday.

Speaking of his Turkey Day tradition at home with his family, Alton said, “It’s really simple. Really simple.  I’m not one of those guys who wants to cook for 13 hours and eat for five. So it’s very, very basic stuff.” What exactly is on his menu? “I handle the turkey. There’s some dressing.  My mother-in-law makes a pecan pie. I like Brussels sprouts. And we, like, cook some sweet potatoes, and it’s done.” he said. I bet Alton makes a mean batch of Brussels sprouts.

We also talked with Alton about his Good Eats Roast Turkey (pictured above), Food Network’s most popular turkey recipe, boasting a 5-star rating and more than 3,400 user reviews.

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