All Posts In Food Network Chef

Quiz: How Well Do You Know the Co-Hosts of The Kitchen?

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, August 30th, 2014

Food Network's The KitchenWeek after week, the co-hosts on The Kitchen come together to celebrate the most-important room in the home. They share their top tips for easy, family-friendly meals, offer new takes on seasonal favorites and even welcome special guests to dish on the latest happenings in the culinary world and beyond. But as fans watching from your living rooms at home, how much do you know about the five faces you see on TV each week? Test your knowledge of Jeff, Geoffrey, Katie, Marcela and Sunny by answering 10 trivia questions, and see if you deserve the title of superfan.

How Well Do You Know the Co-Hosts of The Kitchen?

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Looking Back on One Year of Progress: The Picky Eaters Project

by in Family, Food Network Chef, August 21st, 2014

The Picky Eaters Project One Year LaterMy littlest daughter was always complaining that she was too short, whining about being the shrimp of the family, until the day came when she could brush her teeth without a stool. Suddenly, she realized how much taller she was, and how the tiny bits of daily growth had sneakily added up to something quite significant. That is the nature of slow-but-steady change. We had a similar experience on vacation this summer, except that it was about the tremendous growth we’ve witnessed in our picky eaters.

I’ll back up. I have four daughters, and two and half of them are picky eaters. While I’d had some success in improving their eating with a few strategies here and there, I wanted to see a more fundamental shift, not just an occasional willingness to eat a vegetable. About a year and a half ago, I started researching picky eating. I suspected the story was bigger than finding a magical recipe that would make my kids like spinach. My research confirmed my suspicions: Picky eating was a complex issue with many causes. And each one of my kids probably identified with several of the root causes to varying degrees. So I decided to create a program that focused on root causes, something beyond tips and recipes. I invited Food Network viewers into my home to watch and learn along with us. The result was the unique Food Network Web series called The Picky Eaters Project. By the time we completed the program ourselves and the cameras came down from our family dining room (we called it “carrot cam” because it spied on us all throughout dinner!), my girls were eating foods I never dreamed they would (Margaux liked peas?!) and had started making their own wise choices about healthy eating (Charlotte was reading cereal labels before choosing a box). The response from fellow parents of picky eaters was tremendous, and we were thrilled that The Picky Eaters Project was included as a Webby honoree last year.

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3 Creative Ways The Pioneer Woman Uses a Cast-Iron Skillet

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, August 19th, 2014

The Eggbert's SunriserLong-lasting and relatively inexpensive to purchase, cast-iron skillets are perhaps the ultimate workhorses in the kitchen, as they can move from the stove to the oven and they maintain heat extremely well. Sizzling rib-eye steaks and whole roast chickens may be two of the most-common dishes prepared in these all-purpose pans, but the culinary range of these rustic mainstays goes beyond meaty dinners, as Ree Drummond has showed during the more than seven seasons of The Pioneer Woman. From sweet treats to baked breads, Ree’s proved that there’s practically no limit to what can be prepared in cast-iron skillets. Read on below to learn which unexpected treats she’s making with her vast collection of cast-iron skillets, and get her recipes for savory and sweet favorites.

Breakfast:
Think beyond the griddle when it comes to the most-important meal of the day, and embrace the cast-iron skillet with Ree’s The Eggbert’s Sunriser (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine. A next-level take on hash, this hearty morning meal features layer upon layer of flavor, including salty ham, tender sauteed peppers and satisfying potatoes. Finish with eggs and your favorite salsa for added taste and texture.

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Mini Bites and Mains with Giada

by in Entertaining, Food Network Chef, August 7th, 2014

Mini Bites and Mains with Giada De LaurentiisGiada De Laurentiis knows a thing or two about entertaining for a crowd. “I’m always trying to find things that are easy for people to eat, because it’s really difficult to hold a plate and try and cut things because it gets all over you, so I try to make things you can just pick up in two or three bites,” says Giada. Here, she reveals her favorite cocktail party staples, as well as larger versions of the same treat for those extravagant, sit-down dinners.

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Guy Reveals 8 Techniques to Survive Guy’s Grocery Games

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, July 25th, 2014

Guy Reveals 8 Techniques to Survive Guy's Grocery GamesGuy’s Grocery Games: the only show where chefs have the supermarket to themselves, have to cook in it and have the chance to win some serious dough. “During the first season of the show, when chefs walked in the door, you’d hear, ‘Well, now what do we do?’” Guy shared. “But since most have seen the show, they understand how it progresses,” he continued. But even though they think they know the game now, many still make the same mistakes. And the competition is only getting fiercer.

With that said, FN Dish asked Guy to share eight ways (from his point of view) to survive Guy’s Grocery Games:

1. Don’t over-portion.

2. Don’t add a frivolous garnish.

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Bobby Speaks Out: His Advice to Battle Rivals and His Culinary Weak Spots

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, July 24th, 2014

Beat Bobby FlayBetween Iron Chef America, Throwdown and the premiere season of Beat Bobby Flay, Bobby Flay has faced his share of culinary competitors. He’s no stranger to the demands of heated battles and knows what it takes to succeed in a pressure-packed arena. But, after all, as the goal of Beat Bobby Flay is to find a rival who can take him down, there’s no shortage of chefs ready to try their hands — and recipes — against those of the famed Iron Chef. FN Dish caught up with Bobby on the set of Beat Bobby Flay to learn his advice to his future competitors and what he thinks they ought to do to succeed. Read on below to hear what he had to say and find out what he revealed to be his culinary weak points.

What advice would you give a competitor preparing to battle you for the first time?
Bobby Flay: My advice would be … to challenge me to a dish that they’re really well-versed in, because the lights, the cameras and the action are going to be an obstacle that they probably don’t think is going to be a big deal, but it is.

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How to Survive Cutthroat Kitchen, According to Alton Brown

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, July 23rd, 2014

Cutthroat Kitchen is in full swing (now in its fourth season), and with time also come lessons learned — many lessons learned. Frequent judge Simon Majumdar recently revealed the mind of a Cutthroat judge to FN Dish, and now host Alton Brown is sharing survival techniques. From the pantry to the kitchen, Alton breaks down the most-common mistakes that can easily be rectified, as well as how a chef should best prep himself or herself for sabotages.

Click play on the video above to learn Alton’s tips for acing round after round in the Cutthroat arena.

Summer Slow-Cooking: How to Bake Without Heating Up the House

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, July 19th, 2014

How to Bake Without Heating Up the HouseWho doesn’t love coming home to the aromas of a slow cooker filled with bubbling chili, steaming chicken and dumplings, or hearty beef stew on a cold day? The slow cooker is a staple for the busy person’s winter menu rotation. But come Memorial Day, many of us tuck the slow cooker away in the garage on top of a carton of wool mittens and mothballs, not to be seen before the first chill of Halloween.

I want to change that, one household at a time. I’d like to make the case for slow-cooking in summer. In fact, I think it is the most-underused companion to your summer outdoor barbecue.

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