All Posts By Teri Tsang Barrett

Multipurpose Kitchen Supplies: An A to Z Guide

by in How-to, March 1st, 2012

kitchen tools
Give common kitchen tools a second chance with these tips for new uses for everyday kitchen supplies:

Aluminum foil: Roll into the shape of a cone for a makeshift funnel.
Box grater: Shave away too-burnt bits on toast.
Chip clip: Keep a cookbook propped open to the correct page.
Coffee grinder: Grind fresh spices.
Cocktail shaker: Fill with a head of garlic and shake vigorously to remove the peel.
Egg slicer: Use to thinly slice other items like mushrooms, strawberries and bocconcini.

Muffin tins, pizza cutters, plastic sandwich bags and more »

5 Things to Know About Your Refrigerator

by in How-to, February 15th, 2012

refrigerator safetyA refrigerator in tip-top condition provides prime storage conditions for your perishables and stops odors and bacteria from flourishing.

1. The temperature should remain between 30 degrees F and 40 degrees F. While freezers should clock in at zero or below, a refrigerator that hovers no higher than 40 degrees F is safest for food storage, as it inhibits bacterial growth.

2. Your refrigerator and freezer need to be cleaned each season. Freshen up the fridge and its contents by doing away with odors and lingering germs. Remove everything from inside, weeding out items that need to go. (Put edible odds and ends to use in everything-but-the-kitchen-sink salads, pizzas or soups.) Replace open boxes of baking soda, then take a bucket of water combined with a few spoonfuls of the replaced baking soda (it’s still effective as a household cleaner) and wipe down every surface.

Refrigerator door shelves are where it’s warmest »

5 Ways to Clean Your Cutting Board

by in How-to, January 31st, 2012

cutting board
Feel like your cutting board just isn’t clean enough? Not to worry — you can get the board extra clean with some products likely found in your home.

1. Rinse immediately after use. Studies show that a prewash rinse eliminates enough bacteria so that levels are safe, while submerging the board in dishwater immediately after use transfers pathogens to the wash water. Since wood is a porous surface that absorbs water, submerging a dirtied board could also cause it to split and warp.

2. Disinfect using 3 percent hydrogen peroxide. Pour it over the board and spread it around using a clean sponge. Let it stand for a few minutes as it fizzes to kill germs. Wipe off with the clean sponge and repeat as needed.

Remove stains with coarse salt or baking soda »

Avoid Common Kitchen Accidents

by in How-to, January 24th, 2012

Did you know that the fifth most-common finger cut can happen while you split a bagel? It’s got a name too: BRI, or bagel-related injury. Sometimes avoiding these kitchen problems is easier said than done, so here are a few tips to help you navigate your kitchen more safely.

1. Safely Split a Bagel
Lay it flat on a work surface while pressing down with one hand to keep it steady with your fingers splayed upward and out of harm’s reach. Hold a sharp serrated bread knife in your other hand and slice the bagel horizontally, keeping the knife parallel to the work surface.

2. Wipe Up Spills Immediately
Always keep dishrags handy while you’re cooking in the kitchen and toss one over a spill you might not have time for at the moment as a visual reminder — and clean it up as soon as you have time.

Stabilize your cutting board and more »