All Posts By Sarah De Heer

Goodbye Food Pyramid, Hello Food Plate

by in News, June 2nd, 2011
usda food plate
Photo: USDA.gov

Today, the USDA and First Lady Michelle Obama introduced MyPlate, the updated version of the American nutrition guide — the food pyramid.

The new diet incorporates these seven key messages:

Balancing Calories:
1. Enjoy your food, but eat less.
2. Avoid oversized portions.

Read the remaining 5 messages and take our poll »

Spring Fling: Strawberries

by in In Season, Recipes, June 1st, 2011

strawberries

We’re teaming up with food and garden bloggers to host Spring Fling 2011, a season-long garden party. In coming weeks, we’ll feature favorite garden-to-table recipes and tips to help you enjoy the bounty, whether you’re harvesting your own goodies or buying them fresh from the market. Recently, we dove into the world of rhubarb and artichokes — today, we’re exploring strawberries.

Strawberries are the season’s eye catching bounty that so many people wait for — they’re juicy, flavorful and can be eaten plain, roasted, grilled and more. When buying, choose brightly colored, plump berries that still have their green caps attached. Do not wash them until ready to use them, and store (preferably in a single layer on a paper towel) in a moisture-proof container in the refrigerator for two to three days.

While strawberries vary in size, if you see European Alpine strawberries, which are much smaller than American and Chilean varieties, don’t hesitate to pick them up. They are exquisitely sweet and are considered by many to be the “queen of strawberries.”

This week, we’re going beyond chocolate-covered strawberries and strawberry shortcake with these five new recipes for spring and summer:

Breakfast: Giada’s Strawberry Strata

Lunch: Rachael’s Romaine Hearts with Strawberry Balsamic Vinaigrette

Browse our dinner, dessert and drink picks after the jump »

A Little Pink Is Alright: USDA Lowers Pork’s Minimum Cooking Temperature

by in News, May 24th, 2011

pork chop with red onions

According to MSNBC and the AP: “The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service will announce today that it has lowered its temperature recommendation for cooking pork to 145 degrees. That’s a change from the agency’s longstanding guideline and means pork will be held to the same standard as beef, veal and lamb.”

Previously, the USDA recommended pork be cooked until an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit had been reached.

“With its lower temperature recommendation, the USDA also called for letting the pork rest for 3 minutes after removing it from the grill or oven. The meat’s temperature will remain constant or rise during that period, killing any pathogens,” says the AP.

Read more on MSNBC.

Try these 5 new pork recipes tonight or make the dish pictured above: Guy’s Cuban Pork Chops With Mojo.

Portable Dishes for Memorial Day Weekend

by in Holidays, Recipes, May 23rd, 2011

poppy see potato salad
If you’ve been invited to a party this upcoming Memorial Day, chances are you’ve also offered to help cook or bake something. But what can you bring that can be made ahead, travels well and holds up to the weather (which is hopefully warm)?

Here are some helpful tips to keep in mind:

1. There’s a good chance that your host’s refrigerator will be packed that day, so if your dish has to be kept cool until serving, bring along your own carrier with ice packs — the thought will go a long way.
2. Transport your cooler in the air-conditioned car, not in the trunk.
3. Come prepared with your own serving utensils just in case your host has run out.

Now browse through Food Network’s travel-friendly recipes:

Salads: When it comes to salads, try and stay away from recipes that include mayo. If your recipe calls for a dressing, wait until you are about to serve the dish to mix it in.
Poppy-Seed Potato Salad (pictured above)
Daikon-Carrot Salad
Avocado Salad

Browse more portable recipes for mains and desserts »

8 New Food Trucks Ready to Roll

by in Shows, May 21st, 2011

great food truck race contestants
The second season of The Great Food Truck Race is hitting the road, with chef Tyler Florence returning as host. While you’ll have to wait until Sunday, August 14 to watch the first episode, we can give you a first look now.

Eight trucks from around the country, with three contestants each, embark on a culinary road trip, coming face-to-face with conditions including: weather problems, location mishaps, food sourcing issues and ever-changing customer taste buds. Let’s not forget to factor in the dynamic of the teams, many of them with existing relationships such as: brother and sister, best friends, mother and son and husband and wife to-be.

What’s on the line? The last truck standing wins $100,000 ($50,000 more than last year’s grand prize) and bragging rights.

Meet the road warriors after the jump »

5 Questions With Geoffrey Zakarian of 24 Hour Restaurant Battle

by in Shows, May 12th, 2011

geoffrey zakarian

The second season of 24 Hour Restaurant Battle is in full swing, delivering an all-new set of contestants aspiring to open their own restaurant –- all in just one day.

We asked three of the judges to talk about the new season, the drama we can expect and advice they can share. Recently, Gabriella Gershenson gave us her advice from an editor’s standpoint. Today, we’re talking with Geoffrey Zakarian, chef of The Lambs Club at The Chatwal Hotel and The National in New York City.

Tune in tonight for a new episode of 24 Hour Restaurant Battle at 10pm/9c.

FN Dish: It’s a new season. What are some changes we can expect?

GZ: Because the show has become so popular, the level of competitors has risen, as well. More people want to compete and therefore the end products are much better.

FN Dish: Judging a team is never easy. What are some of the takeaway lessons you learned from last season?

GZ: It is important to see how they work together: the respect they show for each other, the competitors, the customers. I like to see how one emerges as the visionary or the leader. It doesn’t work when there is no symbiosis — you can see it clearly in the end result of the restaurant they create.

Find out if Geoffrey thinks he could open a restaurant in 24 hours »

Alton Brown Wins James Beard Award for Best TV Food Personality

by in Food Network Chef, May 9th, 2011

alton brown
The James Beard Foundation kicked off its awards weekend this past Friday in New York City with the Book, Broadcast and Journalism Awards Dinner.  Food Network’s own Ted Allen co-hosted the event with Bravo’s Top Chef: Just Desserts host Gail Simmons. Together, they helped announce winners for categories like Best Personal Essay, Best Cookbooks and Best Television Program (click here for a complete list of winners).

One Food Network personality walked away with a big win: Alton Brown took home the award for Best TV Food Personality for his show Good Eats. However, this is not Alton’s first James Beard Award. In 2003, Alton won the award for “Best Reference Book” with “I’m Just Here For the Food.” Nominees also up for this award included Bobby Flay for Cooking Channel’s Brunch @ Bobby’s and Duff Goldman for Ace of Cakes.

Tonight, The James Beard Foundation will host the Awards Ceremony and Gala Reception at Lincoln Center to honor the chefs and restaurateurs who have made the food industry unforgettable in 2010.

Congratulations, Alton!

5 Questions With Sue Zemanick: James Beard Rising Star Chef Nominee

by in News, May 6th, 2011

sue zemanick
On Monday, May 9, Tom Colicchio, Emeril Lagasse, Gail Simmons, Andrew Zimmern, Anne Burrell and many others in the food industry will don their best as they join the James Beard Foundation at its annual Restaurant and Chef Awards Dinner.

In honor of the Rising Star Chef of the Year Award, we’re chatting with the 2011 nominees for this category. Yesterday we caught up with Aaron London, chef at Ubuntu in Napa, Calif. Today we’re talking with Sue Zemanick, chef of Gautreau’s in New Orleans. “As a chef it feels amazing to be appreciated and recognized for all of the hard work that my cooks and I do on a day-to-day basis,” Zemanick says. “I feel honored to be considered for such an important award and to be in the company of other such great chefs.”

FN Dish: The theme of this year’s awards is “The Ultimate Melting Pot,” so what is your favorite type of ethnic cuisine?
SZ: Vietnamese.

Paula Deen’s fried chicken or Bobby Flay’s burgers? »

Guy Fieri Pours His Culinary Passion Into Cooking With Kids

by in Food Network Chef, May 6th, 2011

guy fieri
You’ve seen him on Food Network, he’s authored numerous books, including his newest, Guy Fieri Food, but now Guy Fieri is tackling something more near and dear to his heart than anything he’s done before: Cooking With Kids. He’s created the Guy Fieri Cooking With Kids Foundation, where he’s produced videos, mentored kids of all ages and educated families on the importance of getting kids into the kitchen from the very beginning.

We caught up with Guy earlier this week and listened intently as he talked about why this movement struck his heart, what needs to be done next and how families at home can improve life in the kitchen. He gave us a glimpse into his life at home with his two sons, Hunter and Ryder, and talked about their food habits. He even answered several Food Network Facebook fans questions.

FN Dish:  Cooking With Kids — why is it a passion for you?
GF: First of all, I’m a dad, I have two sons. There’s something about people that have kids that make that connection — no matter whose kids they are, you want the best for them. I love talking to them — they call it like they see it.

When you look at kids being deprived, not deprived of food per se, but deprived of something they would like or they need, it bothers me. Knowing how to cook and knowing where food comes from is one of those things. It lays a foundation down in their lives that they will need in order to bridge other pieces together.

Find out what Guy’s two sons eat »

The 5 Best Meals You Can Make Mom This Weekend

by in Holidays, May 6th, 2011

rhubarb crumble
The simplest way to thank mom this Sunday is with a homemade meal — it’s simple, but more importantly, it comes from the heart. With numerous recipes to choose from, Food Network has pulled together its favorite Mother’s Day recipes in one place — for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

1. Breakfast in bed made by the kids. Mom shouldn’t be anywhere near the stove or the sink this Sunday, so gather up the kids and let them try Giada’s recipes like Baked French Toast with Blueberries and Citrus Cream Smoothies. These recipes are easy for the little ones to make (with supervision) and delicious enough for the whole family to eat.
RECIPES: Mother’s Day Breakfast – Let the Kids Cook

2. Schedule tea time. If you’ve planned a large breakfast, opt for a lighter lunch. Ask mom to dress up (make sure she wears a hat) and have a cup of tea with her. Tea sandwiches are an old-fashioned favorite, but these recipes transform the classics. Be sure to try the Ham, Brie and Apple, Olive-Focaccia and Pesto Chicken varieties.
RECIPES: 50 Tea Sandwiches

Get more Mother’s Day menu ideas after the jump »