All Posts By Maria Russo

Maria Russo is an associate editor at Food Network, now living in New York City after being born and raised in the great state of Michigan. She likes her eggs runny, her pasta cheesy and has been known to throw back dozens of oysters at a time.

Best 5 Easter Ham Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, April 15th, 2014

Roasted Fresh Ham with Cider GlazeThe beauty of a ham is that, like a Thanksgiving turkey, it’s a big-batch entree that can feed all of your holiday guests at once, so there’s no need to prepare individual servings of dinner. But also like a turkey, ham needs a bit of dressing up before it’s ready to take center stage at your Easter feast, and in most recipes that next-level addition comes in the form of a glaze. Sweet, spicy, tangy or nearly anywhere in between, glazes complement the natural richness of ham and can play to your guests’ tastes. Check out Food Network’s top-five Easter hams below to find wow-worthy recipes that are a cinch to prepare from Trisha, Melissa, Ina and more chefs.

5. Baked Ham with Brown Sugar-Honey Glaze — Made with just two ingredients — brown sugar and honey — Trisha’s fuss-free glaze tops the ham well into the cooking process, so the sugars don’t burn before the meat is cooked.

4. Ginger-Peach-Glazed Ham — Food Network Magazine recommends letting the ham chill in a ginger-spiced brine for at least 24 hours before cooking it and finishing it with a sweetened Dijon topping.

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Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with Couscous — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, April 14th, 2014

Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with CouscousSoups and stews often get a bad rap as far as quick-fix meals are concerned, as the thought has been that they take hours of slow-simmering to achieve the fullest flavor. But with the help a few foolproof methods and go-to ingredients, it’s surely possible to turn out simple, ready-to-eat dishes in a flash.

Food Network Kitchen transformed the traditional slow-and-low tagine, a classic Moroccan stew, into a weeknight-friendly staple in its recipe for Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with Couscous (pictured above). In place of meat, which may take hours to break down, this fuss-free supper lets vibrant vegetables, like tomatoes and butternut squash, shine, as they can become deliciously tender in mere minutes. Much like classic recipes, this one also boasts a mix of bold, warm spices — cinnamon and cumin — plus a bit of harissa for heat as well as chickpeas and chewy raisins for texture. For added freshness, sprinkle fragrant cilantro atop the tagine before serving, and round out the meal with fluffy couscous.

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The Beginner’s Kitchen According to Marc Forgione

by in Food Network Chef, April 14th, 2014

Marc ForgioneA famed Iron Chef with multiple New York City restaurants, Marc Forgione is certainly no rookie cook, but that doesn’t mean he can’t dole out advice to those just beginning in the kitchen. Recently Marc hosted a hands-on cooking event wherein dozens of fans were tasked with manning the frying pan and making their own dinners, and while many guests were culinary novices, he guided them through the how-tos of making a successful hearty main dish. FN Dish was at this event and caught up with Marc to hear more about his take on elementary cooking, ask which go-to dish a beginner should learn and find out a few of his essential ingredients. Read on below to hear from Marc in an exclusive interview.

What’s the first dish a novice cook should learn to master?
Eggs. ‘Cause if you think about an egg, how many different ways can you cook an egg? Scrambled eggs, soft-scrambled eggs, hard-scrambled eggs, over easy, sunny-side up, soft-boiled, soft-poached, hard-boiled. It’s something that everybody has in their fridge all the time, and it’s almost like culinary school right in your refrigerator. Challenge yourself. When you figure out how to make the perfect sunny-side up, figure out how to make the perfect over easy.

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Testing the Cutthroat Sabotages: From Cooking Station to Shopping Cart

by in Shows, April 13th, 2014


With one swift auction and a bit of bad luck, Cutthroat Kitchen competitors could have all of their seemingly necessary tools and food products taken away from them and replaced with inferior items. From salt and knives to the stove and pans, nothing is safe in Cutthroat Kitchen, including the chefs’ workstations. On tonight’s all-new episode, contestants bid on a game-changing sabotage in Round 2′s enchilada challenge that forces one person to abandon his or her standard setup and fashion another one using a stocked toolbox. The catch? The workspace, heat source and cooktop must be built in and confined to a shopping cart. Was this challenge taking the competition too far and asking too much of one person during a 30-minute challenge? It turns out that the answer is no, as Food Network’s culinary team vetted and approved this sabotage prior to air.

Click the play button on the video above to watch the test unfold and see how one grocery store staple became a fully equipped cook space.
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Restaurant Revisited: Face the Music at Urban Roots

by in Shows, April 9th, 2014

Robert Irvine on Restaurant: ImpossiblePart eatery and part entertainment space, Urban Roots in Oklahoma City, Okla., offered little in the way of quality food when Robert Irvine arrived. He found jumbled dishes and a weak staff, plus owner Chaya Fletcher, who was struggling to maintain her interest in her job. With only two days to work and a budget of just $10,000, Robert and his Restaurant: Impossible team transformed the interior of Urban Roots and updated the menu, ultimately reopening the business to a packed house. Read on below to hear from Chaya and find out how Urban Roots is doing today.

“Since the taping, revenue is up 15 percent,” Chaya says. “Customers are really happy with the design and love the new menu changes.” She adds that both food and entertainment are now proving to attract customers.

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20 Most-Memorable Restaurant: Impossible Missions

by in Shows, April 9th, 2014

Robert Irvine on Restaurant: ImpossibleWith more than seven seasons’ worth of Restaurant: Impossible renovations behind him, Robert Irvine has seen all manner of filth in eatery kitchens, encountered interior decor ranging from the plain and simple to the cluttered and confused, and met owners who have welcomed him wholeheartedly and those who have fought to accept his expertise. He sticks to his goal of transforming businesses and improving lives no matter how difficult the mission, but surely some updates have proved more shocking, some owners more demanding and some reveals more emotional.

Browse insider photos to look back on some of the most-unforgettable challenges Robert has faced on Restaurant: Impossible, then hear from the owners of those eateries to find out how their businesses are faring today.

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Best 5 Scalloped Potato Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, April 8th, 2014

Scalloped Potato GratinEaster is just a few weeks away, and while you may already know that a crowd-pleasing ham or juicy lamb chops will be the star of your spread, it’s time to focus on the all-important side dishes to round out the meal. Both simple to prepare with everyday ingredients and endlessly family friendly, scalloped potatoes are a holiday staple, and whether you stick with a classic rendition featuring cheese and cream, or dress them up with fresh vegetables or meat, they’re sure to wow guests this spring. Check out Food Network’s top-five scalloped potato recipes below from The Pioneer Woman, Bobby, Tyler and more Food Network chefs to find out how they serve this tried-and-true indulgence.

5. Scalloped Potatoes and Ham — Follow Ree’s lead and beef up big-batch scalloped potatoes by layering diced ham among thinly sliced russets and creamy Monterey Jack cheese.

4. Scalloped Potatoes with Tomatoes and Bell Peppers — After quickly broiling the fresh vegetables to bring out their natural sweetness, tomatoes, peppers and onions are baked in a rich potato casserole with a breadcrumb-Gruyere topping for an added crunchy texture and a nutty flavor.

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Crispy Tofu with Vegetables — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, April 7th, 2014

Crispy Tofu with VegetablesFor many meat eaters, dinners often highlight a piece of meat, but if you’re maintaining a vegetarian diet, it can seem as though every meal focuses on vegetables and vegetables alone. Food Network Magazine is changing that, however, with a go-to dish that puts not meat or vegetables but rather hearty, satisfying tofu in the center of the plate.

In its recipe for Crispy Tofu with Vegetables, seasonal, family-friendly produce, including mushrooms, carrots and peas, indeed makes an appearance, but it’s no longer in the spotlight; instead, satisfying tofu is the star of the supper, and rice and veggies are merely supporting players that round out the meal. If you’ve never before cooked with tofu, know that it’s able take on rich, full flavors easily and can stand up to high-temperature cooking methods like grilling and deep-frying. Food Network Magazine pan-fries lightly coated blocks of tofu until they boast a golden-brown crust on the outside, and then pairs them with ginger-laced vegetables and scallions. Since this complete meal can be on the table in only 40 minutes, it’s a timesaver that you can deliver on even the most-hectic weeknights.

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Testing the Cutthroat Sabotages: When a Standard Whisk Won’t Do

by in Shows, April 6th, 2014


Just last week FN Dish introduced fans to the first in a series of Testing the Sabotage videos that highlight exactly how Cutthroat Kitchen sabotages come to be. So many have questioned whether or not the challenges are indeed possible for competitors to conquer within their time constraints, and with these all-new videos, it’s now clear that the answer is yes; every sabotage Alton auctions off has been vetted by Food Network’s culinary team, and now you have the chance to watch those tests unfold.

Click the play button on the video above to check out how the giant-whisk sabotage featured on tonight’s brand-new episode was approved for air, and learn what kind of experimenting had to be done in order to arrive at that conclusion.

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