All Posts By Miriam Garron

A Food Network Kitchen Field Trip

by in Behind the Scenes, September 14th, 2015

A Food Network Kitchens Field TripOn a warm afternoon a few days back, the Food Network culinary team took the F train to the banks of the Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn’s very own Superfund site, for a private tour of Gotham Greens’ third New York sustainable farm. “Don’t touch the greens,” Nicole Baum, Gotham’s marketing and partnerships manager, tells us on the way up to the roof. This is a rare event — to keep the facility sterile, the farm is closed to the public.

It’s hard not to rub a leaf or two between our fingers as we wander through rows of spiky lettuces and purple baby kale. We can smell the basil as we walk toward the herbs; Nicole says that during the daily morning harvest, the whole roof fills with the smell as workers snip and pack it to sell in the store below. That’s hyperlocal distribution, and it keeps GG’s carbon footprint to a minimum. (And allowed Gotham to deliver locally when Hurricane Sandy shut down most access to the city.)

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Reasons to Love Quince

by in Recipes, October 31st, 2013

Reasons to Love QuinceIn The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan posits that some plants beguile us into domesticating them. Apples, tulips, potatoes — they appeal, Michael claims, to fundamental human needs, and so we propagated them, ensuring their survival. They are ubiquitous now not by chance, but by design, both ours and theirs.

Quince, it seems, missed this evolutionary mandate. In fact, quince seems to have taken the opposite tack, stubbornly refusing to play nicely with modern cooks. Always pressed for time, if we cook at all, we’re unlikely to choose a fruit that cannot be eaten raw — it tastes like a mealy, sour apple. They can be difficult to peel, harder to cut and noncommittal about cooking times — 20 minutes one day, it seems, an hour another (yet mine, though slightly underripe, cooked pretty quickly).

But we genuinely think quince will indeed make you happy once you give it a try. We made our recipes as easy as possible. (Honestly, look at other recipes online. Once you tackle finding and prepping the quince, it demands very little in the way of special ingredients or fancy technique — stewing, baking, roasting, some sugar, some alcohol, maybe some spices.)

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Caviar Powder by Petrossian — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in Food Network Chef, Product Reviews, June 13th, 2012

caviar powder with egg
What’s the next best thing you never ate?

The Food Network Kitchens staff might know. We see (taste and smell) ingredients and products just before they take their place in the national palate. Sometimes one of our on-air chefs brings them into our kitchen, sometimes we find them during restaurant dinners or in grocery stores, at home and away. Each month we’re going to share one with you, along with tips or recipes. And we know that many of you devote a good amount of time to exploring, tasting or just getting dinner on the table, so let us know what you find that might just be the next best thing we never ate.

You won’t eat Petrossian’s caviar powder by the spoonful, because just a little dusting of this dried caviar gives a salty, slightly fishy kick to all the classic caviar partners. The dried caviar buttons come in their own mill, so you can grind them over just about anything. We tried it on scrambled and soft-boiled eggs — we like the brininess against the cream and butter, and the heat from the eggs releases the flavors of the powder. Other possibilities? Deviled eggs, seared or smoked scallops, pasta, baked or boiled potatoes (a little crème fraiche wouldn’t hurt, either), crostini with fresh ricotta, tomato salad and crudo.

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Speculoos — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in Food Network Chef, March 13th, 2012

speculoos spread
What’s the next best thing you never ate?

The Food Network Kitchens staff might know. We see (taste and smell) ingredients and products just before they take their place in the national palate. Sometimes one of our on-air chefs brings them into our kitchen, sometimes we find them during restaurant dinners or in grocery stores, at home and away. Each month we’re going to share one with you, along with tips or recipes. And we know that many of you devote a good amount of time to exploring, tasting or just getting dinner on the table, so let us know what you find that might just be the next best thing we never ate.

We Spy Speculoos

Peanut butter without nuts. Nutella without chocolate. While the first speculoos ad campaign might take the usual route of extolling what it’s almost like, we love it for what it is: an unctuous spread, tasting of toast and cinnamon and caramel, made by grinding its namesake Belgian cookie with oil.

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