All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

Trim Greens with Ease

by in Food Network Magazine, August 20th, 2013

KaleRemoving the stems from leafy greens like kale and chard is an oddly satisfying task. Here are two methods:

1. Hold the end of the stem in one hand (left image) and run your knife down both sides of the stem (away from you) to shave off the leaves.

2. Pull the leaves together (right image) and grab them with one hand. Then rip out the stem with the other hand.

(Photographs by Melissa Punch/Studio D.)

Why You Should Braise in Foil

by in Food Network Magazine, July 23rd, 2013

shrimp with potatoesFoil packets make great braising vessels for the grill. We formed this oversize foil bowl to hold the beer-braised potatoes and shrimp (pictured above).

foil1. Stack 2 large sheets of heavy-duty foil. Place the solid ingredients in the center.

 

 

 

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Give Fish Sauce a Try

by in Food Network Magazine, July 16th, 2013

fish sauceDon’t be scared off by a recipe that calls for fish sauce. It smells pungent, but you won’t detect any fishiness in your dish — just a rich, salty, almost meaty flavor. Fish sauce can be used in more than just Asian dishes: Add a splash to tomato sauce or whisk some into salad dressing. Just remember that a little goes a long way.

(Photograph by David Turner/Studio D.)

Poach Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, July 9th, 2013

poached chickenMake your own flavorful broth for poaching chicken or fish by adding vegetables and herbs to simmering water. It’s called a court-bouillon (or “short broth”), and you can customize it with your favorite flavors (we used garlic, scallions and fennel fronds for Food Network Magazine‘s Poached Chicken with Garlic-Herb Sauce, pictured above). Don’t throw out the liquid when you’re done poaching: Store it in the fridge and use it like regular chicken broth.

Grill Veggies Right

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, July 2nd, 2013

veggies on a cutting boardYou don’t need a special basket to grill vegetables. Just slice them on the bias to expose more surface area — this prevents pieces of skinny vegetables like zucchini or yellow squash from falling through the grate, and it lets more of the vegetable come in contact with both your marinade and the grill.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Have You Tried Yuzu?

by in How-to, June 26th, 2013

Yuzuby Jacob Schiffman

I came across the Japanese citrus fruit yuzu during a sushi bar crawl almost 10 years ago. It’s really tart, with a complex, tangy flavor that’s part grapefruit and lemon, part orange, and all delicious. You can use the rind, the juice or both.

The first time I had yuzu, it added sharp tartness to a mayo-based sauce for hamachi (yellowtail). I then started seeing it in condiments for tempura-fried foods, dipping sauces for french fries at bars, on specialty cocktail menus and even in fancy pastries. Chefs ask for it all the time on Iron Chef America — while they mostly ask for the yuzu juice, in my experience as a buyer for Food Network, I’ve seen everything from yuzu marmalade and yuzu mayo to yuzu candy and yuzu vinegar. And sometimes (rarely) I’ve seen fresh yuzu in markets (pictured above) in the late fall through early winter. No matter the format, I think you’ll be seeing a lot more yuzu in the future.

How do you yuzu? Tell us in the comments below.

Try these recipes that feature yuzu

Improve Your Meatballs

by in Food Network Magazine, May 14th, 2013

Greek Meatball StewMeatballs are like burgers: The more you mess with the meat, the tougher they’ll be. Mix the ingredients with your hands until just combined — don’t overwork. And skip the browning; try poaching the meatballs in a broth or sauce, like we did in Food Network Magazine‘s Greek Meatball Stew. They’ll absorb the liquid and turn out extra tender.

Make Juicier Pork

by in Food Network Magazine, May 7th, 2013

Pork ChopsThin cuts of pork can dry out quickly, so try giving them a quick brine first. Pierce chops, cutlets or other thin cuts with a fork, then soak in heavily salted cold water for 15 to 30 minutes; drain and pat dry before cooking. You can add vinegar, sugar, herbs or other flavors to the brine, too. Just remember to go easy on the salt when you cook the meat.

Give it a try with this recipe: Pork Chops With Bean Salad (pictured above)

Know When to Salt

by in Food Network Magazine, May 3rd, 2013

Skillet Chicken and RavioliTiming is everything when you are salting vegetables. To get crisp, browned veggies like the mushrooms in Food Network Magazine‘s Skillet Chicken and Ravioli (pictured above), salt them at the end of cooking — after they’ve browned. To get soft, saucy vegetables like caramelized onions, add salt early on: It draws out moisture, which helps break them down.

Try a New Tomato

by in Food Network Magazine, April 24th, 2013

Greek Meatball StewThere are so many good choices in the canned tomato aisle now. We used fire-roasted tomatoes with green chiles to spice up the Greek Meatball Stew in the May issue of Food Network Magazine. Fire-roasted tomatoes also add a great smoky flavor to marinara sauce. Or buy canned cherry tomatoes and crush them in a saucepan for a slightly sweet, chunky pasta sauce.