All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

Lighten Creamy Dishes

by in Food Network Magazine, December 19th, 2013

evaporated milkEvaporated milk is a great substitute for heavy cream when you want to trim down a recipe: It’s 16 grams of fat and 120 calories lighter per 1/4 cup. Evaporated milk is thick and creamy and it doesn’t curdle when heated the way low-fat milk can. Try it in soup, mac and cheese, or creamed veggies, like in the Chile-Rubbed Steak with Creamed Corn recipe from Food Network Magazine.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D.)

Shichimi Togarashi — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, December 17th, 2013

Shichimi Togarashiby Susan Vu of Food Network Kitchens

I used to work in a Japanese restaurant and everyone there put shichimi togarashi (a Japanese mix of seven ingredients: two kinds each of chile flakes and sesame seeds, then orange zest, ginger, hemp seeds and seaweed) on everything — even french fries. It’s such a good, all-around condiment. My three favorite food components are heat, acid and crunch, and between the chiles, orange and sesame seeds, this seasoning touches upon all three of them. I put it on roast potatoes right when they come out of the oven, I love to toss blistered shishito peppers with it and a squeeze of lime juice, and it’s a great finisher for seafood too.

Look for shichimi togarashi at Japanese grocery stores or order it online.

Rethink Your Spices

by in Food Network Magazine, December 10th, 2013

Rethink Your SpicesSpices like cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg have been used for centuries in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Latin American cooking to bring out rich, meaty flavors in savory dishes. Try adding a pinch or two of your favorite baking spice to a rub for meat, or drop a cinnamon stick into simmering tomato sauce. Just remember: A little goes a long way.

Choose the Right Syrup

by in Food Network Magazine, November 19th, 2013

syrupDon’t be fooled by the label “Grade A” on a bottle of maple syrup: It’s no better than Grade B. Grade B syrup is darker and has a stronger maple flavor; Grade A is milder. We prefer Grade B for cooking (we used it in a Kale-Sesame Chicken Salad for Food Network Magazine). Both grades are more expensive than the imitation stuff (“pancake syrup”), but real maple syrup is worth the splurge.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D.)

Fall Cookbook Favorites

by in Books, November 12th, 2013

Fall Cookbook Favorites 2013by Leila Clifford, Food Network Kitchens Intern

Every season, Food Network looks forward to a new crop of cookbooks and passing our favorites around the office; these are the ones that keep disappearing from people’s desks this fall.

Edward Lee’s new cookbook, Smoke and Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New Southern Kitchen, is an almost-universal favorite for its innovative flavors and new takes on American cuisine. Rob Bleifer, Food Network Kitchens’ executive chef, said of Edward’s book: “Lee’s approach to ingredients often surprises me. Sorghum, for example — sorghum in everything. It’s cool.”

We’re also big fans of Fuchsia Dunlop’s newest book, Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking. “The recipes are very doable and fast, and your pantry doesn’t need to be jam-packed to execute Fuchsia’s dishes,” said Jonathan Milder, culinary research librarian. “She doesn’t dumb it down — she makes you realize how simple Chinese home cooking really is. Give me steamed whole fish any day and chili bean paste on everything.”

Keep reading for more picks

Make Coffee Your Secret Ingredient

by in Food Network Magazine, November 12th, 2013

slow-cooker chiliBakers often use coffee in brownies and cakes to bring out the chocolate flavor. But coffee works just as well in savory recipes — especially slow-cooked dishes like Food Network Magazine‘s Slow-Cooker Chili. Try adding a shot to tomato sauce, gravy or stew, and if you don’t have brewed coffee, just dilute a little instant espresso.

Food Network Kitchens’ Waffle Iron Hits and Misses

by in How-to, November 6th, 2013

Food Network Kitchens' Waffle Iron Hits and Missesby Heather Ramsdell and Rupa Bhattacharya

While we were working on the waffle project, we got really into waffling. We were waffling foods left and right to see what waffling’s magical crispifying effect improved (and what it didn’t). Here are some of their stories:

Keep reading for more hits and misses

How to Get a Better Chop

by in Food Network Magazine, November 5th, 2013

food processorWhen you’re chopping garlic, onion or other vegetables in a food processor, keep the motor running and drop the ingredients through the feed tube. The food will bounce around and won’t get stuck in the blade or along the edge of the bowl, so you’ll end up with nice, even pieces.

(Photograph by Ben Goldstein/Studio D.)

Why You Should Swap Chicken Breasts for Thighs

by in Food Network Magazine, October 29th, 2013

chicken-broccoli stir-fry

Next time you make a stir-fry, use chicken thighs instead of the usual breasts. Thighs are juicier and more flavorful, and because they have a little more fat (they’re dark meat), they don’t dry out as easily. Another bonus: Thighs usually cost less per pound.

Try It: Chicken-Broccoli Stir-Fry

Time Fish Perfectly

by in Food Network Magazine, October 8th, 2013

Thai Fish CurryMany recipes tell you to test fish for doneness with a fork: If it flakes easily, it’s ready. But sometimes that’s too late. Instead, watch the fish carefully and pull it from the heat just when it changes from translucent to opaque, or even a moment before, as we did for Food Network Magazine‘s Thai Fish Curry. The fish will continue cooking after you take it off the heat.