All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

Wait! I want to know everything.

by in View All Posts, November 24th, 2008

Every so often, the linguistic stylings of New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni bring one to tears:

I’m fond enough of chicken wings, and that fondness goes far enough back, that when I first learned of the movie “Wings of Desire,” I assumed it was an ode to poultry slathered with a tangy sauce and ready to be dipped in blue cheese, should the poultry lover so choose.

But then one googles, and one realizes the estimable college football blog Every Day Should be Saturday was all over this already. Is it worth another mention? Of course it is.

(recipe, if you’re so inclined)

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Mixed Messages

by in View All Posts, November 21st, 2008

So, this sign magically appeared this morning next to our coffee maker. It makes a legitimate point, and besides, with the average work-related caloric intake around here being on the high side, it’s certainly salient.

So I opened the coffee maker, to make sure that I was getting my low-in-calories-and-good-for-me-milk, and found the following:

Yup, we’re out of skim milk. Now, the question is, are we out of skim milk because of the sign, or did the sign go up because we’re out?

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Thanksgiving Survey from the Food Network Kitchens

by in View All Posts, November 19th, 2008

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, I thought I would ask the Food Network Kitchens crew a few critical questions about some Thanksgiving favorites.

While most of the choices were easy, two questions were particularly difficult. Brining is downright controversial in the FN Kitchens. Although many stand by the method, one of our recipe developers’ take was, “brine, well, that just makes me angry!”

Not so surprisingly, it looks like our cooks just can’t get out of the kitchen, except those who still crave mom’s cooking or just can’t stand the clean-up.

Rob, our executive chef, struggled with his response: “Well, in a perfect world, I’d want a house big enough to cook it all and host all the guests,” while Athen, our steward, cuts right to the chase: “Cook? You must be crazy, I just want to eat and leave!”

Happy Thanksgiving!

Claudia Sidoti, Recipe Developer

Click through for recipes and results: Read more

My 15-minute Meal

by in View All Posts, November 18th, 2008

So, I’m a mom of an 11-month-old and a 4-year-old, and I work full-time and still have to feed everyone and pack lunch.

Here’s my go-to 15 minute meal (even 30 minutes is too long!) that feeds the whole family and can go to preschool with my daughter for lunch:

Take 1 (32-ounce) box organic low sodium chicken broth and bring it to a boil in a saucepan. Add 1 cup alphabet pasta and cook. Chop up about a cup of spinach leaves (or just use frozen spinach) and add it to the pasta to wilt.

At this point, I remove a cup or so for my 11-month old, since he can’t have whole eggs yet. Beat up an egg or 2 and add some grated parm. While soup is boiling, drizzle in the egg mixture and boil another minute. Ta-da! Dinner, lunch, and we can work on letters while we eat it.

Jill Novatt, Executive Culinary Producer

The New Yorker's Annual Food Issue, an Appreciation

by in View All Posts, November 17th, 2008

It’s excellent again, as per usual. Highlights include FNK favorite (and Vendy judge) Calvin Trillin on Texas barbecue; former NYTimes food critic Mimi Sheraton on the fish soup brodetto, and what I believe to be the first-ever documented usage of the phrase “hot ghetto mess” in the New Yorker, in Burkhard Bilger’s article on craft beer.

Most of it, sadly, is not available online to non-subscribers; if you’re not a subscriber, it’s definitely worth newsstanding.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

When Life Gives You Heirloom Apples, Make Heirloom Applesauce

by in In Season, November 14th, 2008

Our main produce vendor offered to send over some samples of heirloom apples. I’ve always loved apples, and I’ve been getting more and more excited about the growing variety of apples out there, as there really is such a huge difference in taste and texture.

The good news is that our sales rep brought 3 varieties: Black Oxford, Roxbury Russet, and Blue Pearmain.

The bad news is that there were only 4 of each variety.

I immediately ran to look online to see what info I could find on each apple. As it turns out, Blue Pearmain are excellent for baking, Roxbury Russets are old cider apples that are also good eaten as-is, and Black Oxfords are supposed to be good just eaten out of hand.

Well, it was exciting to try these centuries-old varieties that almost went extinct, but nothing jumped out at me and screamed “let’s buy more now!”

I turned away mildly disappointed and looked at what remained. Since it was mid-afternoon with the weekend fast approaching and 1 or 2 of each variety now gone to tasting, there was only one thing left for any chef to do: make applesauce!

I wanted to let the unique flavors of each apple shine through, so I added just a pinch of cinnamon and a few tablespoons of sugar, cooked them slowly for 30 minutes, passed them through a food mill, and wow, some of the best applesauce I’ve had in years!

I can’t wait to try more varieties!

Rob Bleifer, Executive Chef

Esquire's Totally 80s Thanksgiving

by in View All Posts, November 11th, 2008

Esquire magazine has opened up their archive of celebrity Thanksgiving recipes from the 80s; highlights include William Styron’s clam chowder, Helen Gurley Brown’s strangely tragic Skinny Hot Buttered Rum, and Timothy Leary‘s prune-and-apple-stuffed roast goose, which I wish were a metaphor for something, but sadly is not.

No word yet on whether there’ll be a 50s edition; I’m holding out for all Alice B. Toklas, all the time.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

...1020...262728...30...