All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

Mark Bittman Does Colbert

by in View All Posts, March 4th, 2009

Talking about his new book Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating. I learned to cook from his Minimalist series, so I’m happy to see him hold his own here:

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Ha

by in View All Posts, March 3rd, 2009

We’re as complicit as anyone in re: this phenomenon, but didn’t think it’d go this far.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

It slices; it dices; it isn't terribly useful for stabbing people

by in View All Posts, March 2nd, 2009

Both Eat Me Daily and Chow have recently touched upon this article in the Economist covering a recent study on kitchen knives and violence; researchers found that the sheep’s foot style (a blunt tip commonly found in santoku knives) achieves the ideal balance between still-useful-in-the-kitchen and not-suitable-for-assault.

So, santoku’s three virtues: slicing, dicing, and mincing not stabbing? There’s marketing gold here if we only figure out how to harness it.

That said, any excuse to run a drum-and-bass-backbeated knife PSA is fine by us, so we’ll let DJ Pie Safety take it from here:

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

I Always Knew

by in View All Posts, February 27th, 2009

something was different about Charlie:

Dave Mechlowicz, Culinary Purchasing Manager

Kicking [it] Up a Notch

by in View All Posts, February 27th, 2009

If this isn’t the mark of good cookware, the ultimate in product testing, we don’t know what is. Could there possibly be a better advertisement for a set of cookware than a 70-year-old woman swinging YOUR 5-quart saucepan like a set of nunchucks while fighting off four teenage intruders? Impossible.

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

Put a cork in it, lambs!

by in View All Posts, February 26th, 2009

Not Your Bubbe's Kosher Cookoff

by in View All Posts, February 26th, 2009

Having grown up in a kosher home, with 4 generations of Jewish home cooking under my belt, I was excited to be one of the “chosen people” last week — chosen to be part of a panel of judges for the 3rd annual Manischewitz Cook-off, that is.

The six finalists, competing live for a $25,000 grand prize package, were picked from hundreds of applicants. Their objective was to make a creative, attractive and delicious dish using Manischewitz products.

The finalists:

  • Ruby Red Risotto with Pistachio-Basil Pesto and Garlic Herb Goat Cheese
  • Laced Lamb with Figs
  • Marvelous Mediterranean Falafel Sliders
  • Meaty Manischtroni
  • Sloppy Moses
  • Mani Meatloaves

The falafel sliders, using ground turkey, caramelized onions, lettuce, tahini, and falafel mix, came out unanimously on top. It was impressive to the judges how moist and flavorful they were. As far as I’m concerned, this one-handed sandwich parted the sea and said, move over Sloppy Moses!

Maybe I should enter my meshuggenah matzah balls next year…

Jake Schiffman, Purchasing Assistant

Coming a little late to this

by in View All Posts, February 25th, 2009

But you really need to see a guy eat an entire 3-pound chicken in a can. For the purposes of research, of course.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Happy Fat Tuesday

by in View All Posts, February 24th, 2009
(image courtesy flickr user CTB4)

In celebration: what seems to be the best-worded king cake recipe on the Internet, excerpted from the original 1901 version of the Picayune’s Creole Cookbook.

As an aside — the level of culinary knowledge/fortitude assumed in this recipe is fascinating, especially when compared to similar recipes from now.

As another aside, yes, every Tuesday at FN is essentially Fat Tuesday, but I’ll thank you not to mention that.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Wine Manifesto: Part 1, with lessons forthcoming

by in View All Posts, February 23rd, 2009

At dinner last night at a new Italian restaurant near where my parents live (which is otherwise impeccable and a gift to the region), I had a fairly bizarre wine-ordering experience. I told the well-meaning woman tasked with wine service that I was looking for a red from Trentino, it didn’t have to be from Trentino but I like a more-restrained, Austrian style, that I’d had one of them on the (incredibly long and well-chosen) list and liked it, and what would she recommend along those lines? She told me that if I liked the wine I’d had before, I should have it again, or, if I would like to try something new, “everything on the list is good.” The list, mind you, is more than a hundred bottles long.

Ok. Shift gears. New tactic. I like the Sylvaner from this producer on your list, known for sort of wacky, interesting wines; can you recommend something similar in style, but red? After mis-correcting my pronunciation of Sylvaner, and expressing both surprise and slight disdain for my enjoyment of said Sylvaner, she recommended first a Supertuscan and then a Rosso di Montalcino, the sort of wines that are basically the exact opposite of everything I’d been asking for.

Later in the evening, we overheard her loudly telling the table next to us that “knowing about wine is pretentious” and she didn’t believe it was necessary.

Well, clearly.

But, and this is something that I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about, as a large part of my job involves wine education — the first thing I usually tell people is to find a trusted expert, whether it’s a wine store with a well-curated selection and a friendly staff, a sommelier at a restaurant you go to regularly, or even an importer whose tastes match yours. Once you have a grounding, and a general idea where your preferences lie, it’s a lot easier to get make sense of a hundred-bottle wine list or giant wine store.

I guess my question is what responsibility a restaurant has to its customers when its list is a) incredibly long and b) not cheap. I’m sure you could make the argument that by curating their list well, the restaurant has fulfilled their obligation — but man, no wonder the most common question I get is how not to be intimidated by a wine list.

So, announcing wine lessons, to be posted here with some sort of recurring regularity. Keep your eyes peeled.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

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