All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

Not from our kitchens, but…

by in View All Posts, March 12th, 2009

Photoblog The Selby takes a look today at the world of pastry genius Pierre Hermé. Check through to the interview at the end, in case you ever wondered what a macaron might look like in sketch form. [via]

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

U-Mommy, indeed

by in View All Posts, March 11th, 2009

Jonathan: This is the part of that article that’s going to stick with me:

Part of the reason why the palate responds so favourably towards glutamate could be our early exposure to it – breast milk has very high levels, 10 times higher than cow’s milk.

Jill: It’s a shame I only know that now that I’m done breastfeeding – I missed out on 11 months of umami jokes.

Jonathan: You mean umommy jokes?

With a Red Hot Poker

by in View All Posts, March 10th, 2009

I’m an FCI alum and I go back several times each year to judge final exams or enjoy a meal in the dining room. The last time was quite interesting. The food was quite good, but what proved to be most memorable were a pair of new cocktails.

FCI has an in-house mad scientist, David Arnold, who is reviving the centuries-old practice of heating drinks with a red hot poker. Once upon a time, bars literally had irons in the fire to warm drinks for weary travelers. Now, there’s a contraption that looks as though it came off the set of some 1950’s sci-fi epic.

It was a blast to watch the cocktails get made, and quite enjoyable to drink them. The bartender dons flame-proof gloves and a pair of goggles (the alcohol ignites when the 1000+ degree poker enters the glass, and flames rise at least one foot tall). The cocktails are much lighter than standard cocktails, as so much of the alcohol burns off, but the flavors are more complex. Perhaps it was our minds playing tricks, but I swear we were able to taste some caramelized sugar from the intense heat of the probe and the flaming alcohol.

Rob Bleifer, Executive Chef

The World's Smallest Food Critic

by in View All Posts, March 9th, 2009

and her take on my homemade gnocchi with eggplant and sausage ragu:

Jill Novatt, Executive Culinary Producer

It Came From The Library: 1

by in News, March 6th, 2009

Hi, I’m Jonathan. I maintain the Food Network Library, and write ridiculous things about belching lambs and their effect on climate change. A big part of my job is keeping up with what’s happening in food; what people are cooking, eating, and talking about. Every week, I’ll deliver a quick roundup of what’s crossed my desk. This week’s installation:

Though the bacon explosion continues to reverberate across the internet—its authors recently signed a 6-figure book deal (for a book which, we hear, won’t even contain the bacon explosion recipe)—nothing has captured the zeitgeist like the sudden fame of Clara Cannucciari, 93-year-old great grandmother, cook, and star of the incredibly charming Great Depression Cooking (check out her latest video below).

Fascinating here is that both the Bacon Explosion, and the excess it embodies, as well as Great Depression Cooking, with its aura of scarcity and deprivation, feel equally of the moment. Interested to see where this all goes over the coming months.

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

Belly Up

by in View All Posts, March 6th, 2009

to some warmth this winter with a crocheted bacon scarf, courtesy of Monster Crochet.

Hot!

Vince Camillo, Food Stylist

Our Broken Food System

by in View All Posts, March 5th, 2009

For those interested in food and politics, here’s an interesting piece that explains why recent popular food movements, though well-intentioned, aren’t fixing our food system. And if that isn’t enough, I just learned about this documentary called Food, Inc. yesterday, which covers huge problems in our country’s food industry. I can’t wait to see it.

Shirley Fan, Nutritionist

Mark Bittman Does Colbert

by in View All Posts, March 4th, 2009

Talking about his new book Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating. I learned to cook from his Minimalist series, so I’m happy to see him hold his own here:

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Ha

by in View All Posts, March 3rd, 2009

We’re as complicit as anyone in re: this phenomenon, but didn’t think it’d go this far.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

It slices; it dices; it isn't terribly useful for stabbing people

by in View All Posts, March 2nd, 2009

Both Eat Me Daily and Chow have recently touched upon this article in the Economist covering a recent study on kitchen knives and violence; researchers found that the sheep’s foot style (a blunt tip commonly found in santoku knives) achieves the ideal balance between still-useful-in-the-kitchen and not-suitable-for-assault.

So, santoku’s three virtues: slicing, dicing, and mincing not stabbing? There’s marketing gold here if we only figure out how to harness it.

That said, any excuse to run a drum-and-bass-backbeated knife PSA is fine by us, so we’ll let DJ Pie Safety take it from here:

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

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