All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

What Is Harissa? And 5 Ways to Use It — All-Star Academy

by in Shows, April 13th, 2015

HarissaBy: Leah Brickley

This week on All-Star Academy, the competition got hot (literally) when mentor Bobby Flay instructed mentee Joseph to add harissa to his tomato sauce for a surprising spin on his duck Parmesan dish.

We here in Food Network Kitchen are big fans of the spicy North African condiment, made from dried red chiles, garlic, and spices like coriander, caraway and cumin, so we cheered Joseph on as he added spoonfuls of the brick-red paste to his simmering sauce. Here’s a little harissa tutorial if you’re thinking about doing the same.

Harissa can be found in specialty food stores (or maybe even at your local market) in a tube, jar or can. It’s super-concentrated (think tomato paste), and heat levels can differ from brand to brand, so be sure to always taste it before cooking. You can add the concentrated paste straight into soups, stews and sauces, like Joseph did, or add just a few ingredients to make an entirely new condiment. Here are four other fun ways to play with harissa:

  • Mix it into softened butter and freeze into a log in parchment. Melt pats of harissa butter on grilled steak, grilled chicken or a baked potato.
  • Whisk olive oil, lemon juice, water and some salt into the paste. Use this new drizzly condiment on grain bowls or vegetables, or use it as a spicy vinaigrette for a green salad.
  • Stir harissa into mayonnaise. Use it as a dip for chicken fingers, or spread it on a sandwich.
  • Add a little harissa to your peanut butter for a spicy-sweet-salty spread. We love it on just saltine crackers for a quick snack, but you can also pair it with a little apricot preserves for a made-over PB&J.

 

There’s only one episode left! Tune in this coming Sunday at 10|9c to find out who takes home the $50,000 cash prize.

What’s in the Can? — All-Star Academy: The Competition Continues

by in Shows, April 7th, 2015

tuna meltDuring the latest episode of All-Star Academy, the remaining contestants got a double whammy — they all had to share guest mentor Robert Irvine and create a winning dish using a mystery canned good. Once all the cans were opened, we learned that chicken, ham, tuna, salmon and clams were on the menu. Some of you may have run for the hills faced with such a challenge, for those of you left, which canned protein would you have wanted?

We in Food Network Kitchen (well, some of us) would go straight for the tuna. But not all cans of tuna are equal. There are many types from which to choose. Below is a little bit about what’s in the can.

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Go Fry an Egg — All-Star Academy: The Competition Continues

by in Recipes, Shows, March 31st, 2015

Cooking the perfect fried eggOur knees were knocking during the latest episode of All-Star Academy when the remaining contestants served up their alphabet-themed dishes — there needed to be four ingredients beginning with the letters S, T, A and Y in each dish — to judge and restaurateur Donatella Arpaia. We were sad to see Angela, one of Bobby Flay’s mentees, go after she was docked major points for a messy fried egg (Y was for “yolk” in her dish). Even if you have all the time in the world, the simplest of dishes takes practice and technique. Follow Food Network Kitchen’s step-by-step how-to for the perfect fried, sunny-side-up egg.

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All-Star Academy: The Competition Continues in Food Network Kitchen

by in Recipes, Shows, March 20th, 2015

If you’re like some of us in Food Network Kitchen, then competition shows make your heart race right along with the contestants! That was the case this past Sunday, during the third episode of All-Star Academy, when Alex Guarnaschelli’s and Bobby Flay’s teams went head-to-head in a sweet-turns-savory cook-off. Who else wanted to hide behind a couch cushion when Ted Allen revealed the elimination challenge was cooking with marshmallows in a savory dish? Read more

In the Kitchen With: Lisa Fain, the Homesick Texan

by in Books, How-to, Recipes, February 5th, 2015

The first thing you notice about Lisa is her cowboy boots. Cherry red, spit polished and worn-in just enough, they tell you everything you need to know about the Houston transplant’s cooking: It’s bright, approachable, comes from the West and will linger in your memory for days afterward. To bring some welcome variety to the winter kitchen, we invited the James Beard Award winner to our Manhattan headquarters in Chelsea Market to make Chicken Spaghetti, one of her favorite dishes from her latest volume, The Homesick Texan’s Family Table. Make this simple and comforting recipe in your own kitchen with help from Lisa’s step-by-step how-to.

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In the Kitchen With: Dorie Greenspan

by in Books, Holidays, How-to, December 16th, 2014

“I guess I’m a baking nerd,” says Dorie Greenspan with a sly smile. The award-winning cookbook author is standing in the middle of Food Network Kitchen, whisk in hand and talking about her latest book, Baking Chez Moi. “I’ve come to think of myself as a baking evangelist. I want people to have the satisfaction of making something themselves. So when I write, I try to imagine I’m talking to a newbie.” Dedicated to the home cooking she delights in during the four months a year she spends in Paris, Greenspan’s newest book is friendly and approachable, straddling both the high (Bubble Éclairs) and humble (Chocolate Chip Cookies). Her Custardy Apple Squares are an ideal mix of the two, and Greenspan happily demonstrated how to whip them up during her visit. “I love this recipe,” she says. “It’s so easy, so unfussy, so French.” Follow Dorie’s step-by-step how-to to make them at home.

For many sweets lovers, Greenspan’s name is synonymous with one thing above all: amazing cookies. So we couldn’t let her go without asking her to share a few of her best cookie tips, too. Here’s what we learned. Read more

In the Kitchen With: Katie Workman

by in Books, Family, September 2nd, 2014

In the Kitchen With: Katie WorkmanFor thousands of us, fall is the real season of renewal, when back-to-school planning encompasses everything from freshly sharpened pencils to visions of easier, tastier — and saner — mealtimes. If those visions are starting to blur a couple of weeks into the new routine, take heart and meet Katie Workman. The mother of an 11- and a 14-year-old, she is the author of The Mom 100 Cookbook: 100 Recipes Every Mom Needs in Her Back Pocket.

The book’s frank and funny tone, elevated comfort food and down-to-earth suggestions for involving kids in the kitchen have endeared Workman to legions of fans (and helped spawn a sequel due out next summer). Last month, she stopped by Food Network Kitchen in New York’s Chelsea Market to make her Taco Night tacos and dish on late-night cooking, the one kitchen tool she can’t live without and annoying food habits all parents should avoid. Here are some questions and answers from our conversation, plus three family-friendly recipes worth incorporating into your repertoire right now. (For more on Katie’s visit, check out The One Recipe: Katie Workman’s Taco Night Tacos.)

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Barbecue: A Classic and a New Kid

by in Books, September 1st, 2014

Barbecue: A Classic and a New-Kidby Michelle Park

There is arguably no other American cooking tradition quite as lore ridden as barbecue. This month, we’ve handpicked two cookbooks devoted to that mouthwatering marriage of meat and smoke that will urge you to partake before summer officially ends. The first is one of the most-classic books we have on the subject, and the second is sure to become one.

The Classic
The Complete Book of Outdoor Cookery, James A. Beard and Helen Evans Brown (1955)

When navigating something as American as barbecue, who better to turn to than quintessential American cooks? A little antiquated on some fronts, pheasant being less common than it used to be, The Complete Book still has much to offer anyone entering the foray of outdoor cooking — something tells me corn pudding and grilled sausages won’t go out of style anytime soon. Inside, you’ll find a handy guide of times and temperatures for nearly every cut of meat you can put over a fire. True to its title, the book also dedicates entire chapters to tried-and-true sauces, marinades, appetizers and sides to round out your all-American feast — each, of course, matched with its ideal meat pairings. At once authoritative and approachable, this book is the trustworthy friend you’ll consult before any cookout. The American palate may have since graduated beyond French dressing, but we think this book is here to stay.

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How to Fake a Pizza

by in Food Network Magazine, July 22nd, 2014

Turn basic flatbread into a quick dinner on the grill: Brush lavash, pocketless pita, naan or other flatbread with oil and grill until marked. Flip, top with cheese and let melt, then remove from the grill and top with arugula, tomatoes, corn or other fresh vegetables, or add some prosciutto or ham. Avoid traditional tomato sauce though — it can make the bread soggy.

Photograph by Justin Walker

How to Pickle Fruit

by in Food Network Magazine, July 8th, 2014

Pickling isn’t just for veggies. Slice any relatively firm fruit like strawberries, grapes, peaches or cherries, then cover with vinegar (balsamic, sherry or white wine), add some sugar and salt and let sit 10 minutes. Drain and add to a salad, like Food Network Magazine’s Pickled Strawberry Salad (pictured above), or serve on grilled meat.

Photograph by Justin Walker