All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

Freeze Some Bacon

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, February 27th, 2014

Freeze Some BaconBacon is much easier to chop when it’s cold. Keep a stash in the freezer for weeknight meals — separate from the strips you use for breakfast — then just slice and dice straight from the freezer. If you need to separate the strips, microwave on defrost just until you can pull them apart.

Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

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Find a Lean Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, February 13th, 2014

Find a Lean SteakGood news for steak lovers: There are 16 cuts that contain fewer than 10 grams of fat per serving. Some of our favorites are top round, blade and flank because you don’t have to marinate them if you’re short on time. The key to keeping lean steak tender: Cook it to medium-rare and thinly slice it against the grain.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Make a Lighter Cheese Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, February 4th, 2014

How to Make a Lighter Cheese SauceTo create Food Network Magazine‘s trimmed-down mac and cheese (pictured above), we skipped the usual butter-flour roux and used pureed cooked cauliflower as a thickener. The cauliflower doesn’t alter the flavor — it just adds creaminess without the fat. It’s a great way to sneak in fiber and vitamins too. Try the cheese sauce from this recipe on top of veggies or other sides.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Fake Your Fries

by in Food Network Magazine, January 28th, 2014

Fake Your FriesBaked fries can taste as good as the real thing. Here’s the trick: Dip the potato sticks in egg whites whisked with herbs or spices before baking. Spread on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray and coat with more cooking spray, then bake at 425 degrees F until golden. The egg whites dry out in the oven and make the fries extra crisp — without excess oil. Try it out in Food Network Magazine‘s under-500-calories Chicken and Cheese Poutine (pictured above).

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Cook with Tea

by in Food Network Magazine, January 20th, 2014

Cook With TeaTo add flavor without extra calories, turn to your favorite tea: Steep a bag in water and use that for boiling vegetables, cooking grains or poaching chicken and fish (like in Food Network Magazine‘s Green Tea Salmon). Try all kinds of tea, such as black, mint, chai, chamomile or spice. Just don’t steep the tea bag for too long; the flavor can become bitter.

Za’atar — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 14th, 2014

Za'atar - The Next Best Thing You Never Ateby Jacob Schiffman

When I lived in Israel my junior year abroad in college, I started noticing that a lot of my favorite foods had a nutty, floral flavor I hadn’t seen before. I found out it was a Middle Eastern spice blend made of woody herbs (usually thyme and oregano, but traditionally hyssop), sumac and sesame seeds. There I saw it mostly on hummus or on flatbreads, but now I love putting it on roasted vegetables or fish (with a bit of honey), grilled chicken or baked eggs at breakfast. There are regional varieties of za’atar (Jordanian has more sumac and Israeli sometimes includes dill); I like the Israeli style, probably because that’s the first one I tried. Whichever one you prefer, let me know what you like to eat it on.

Find it: Look for it in most good grocery stores and any specialty spice shop.

Three Ways to Use: Ranch Dressing Mix

by in Food Network Magazine, January 4th, 2014

Huevos RancherosFood Network Magazine put chefs from Food Network Kitchens to the test: Create recipes that put a new spin on a pantry staple like chocolate syrup or creamed corn.

Ranch dressing isn’t just a great salad topper. Try these recipes that use the tangy mix to add some spunk to breakfast and easy snacks.

Click here for the recipes

Buy Bone-In Cuts

by in Food Network Magazine, December 31st, 2013

chicken-apple saladWe love boneless meat for fast weeknight meals, but sometimes bone-in cuts are worth the extra cooking time. The bone prevents overcooking and insulates the meat, which makes it extra juicy and tender. Find a simple method for roasting bone-in chicken breasts in this Chicken and Apple Salad recipe from Food Network Magazine.

What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

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