All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

Three Ways to Use: Ranch Dressing Mix

by in Food Network Magazine, January 4th, 2014

Huevos RancherosFood Network Magazine put chefs from Food Network Kitchens to the test: Create recipes that put a new spin on a pantry staple like chocolate syrup or creamed corn.

Ranch dressing isn’t just a great salad topper. Try these recipes that use the tangy mix to add some spunk to breakfast and easy snacks.

Click here for the recipes

Buy Bone-In Cuts

by in Food Network Magazine, December 31st, 2013

chicken-apple saladWe love boneless meat for fast weeknight meals, but sometimes bone-in cuts are worth the extra cooking time. The bone prevents overcooking and insulates the meat, which makes it extra juicy and tender. Find a simple method for roasting bone-in chicken breasts in this Chicken and Apple Salad recipe from Food Network Magazine.

What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

Keep reading

Jazz Up Your Chops

by in Food Network Magazine, December 24th, 2013

braised pork chops with sageNext time you’re searing pork chops, heat a few sprigs of hearty herbs (like sage or rosemary) in the oil and cook the meat right on top of them. The herbs will subtly flavor the meat as it cooks. Check out these Braised Pork Chops with Sage (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine.

Lighten Creamy Dishes

by in Food Network Magazine, December 19th, 2013

evaporated milkEvaporated milk is a great substitute for heavy cream when you want to trim down a recipe: It’s 16 grams of fat and 120 calories lighter per 1/4 cup. Evaporated milk is thick and creamy and it doesn’t curdle when heated the way low-fat milk can. Try it in soup, mac and cheese, or creamed veggies, like in the Chile-Rubbed Steak with Creamed Corn recipe from Food Network Magazine.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D.)

Shichimi Togarashi — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, December 17th, 2013

Shichimi Togarashiby Susan Vu of Food Network Kitchens

I used to work in a Japanese restaurant and everyone there put shichimi togarashi (a Japanese mix of seven ingredients: two kinds each of chile flakes and sesame seeds, then orange zest, ginger, hemp seeds and seaweed) on everything — even french fries. It’s such a good, all-around condiment. My three favorite food components are heat, acid and crunch, and between the chiles, orange and sesame seeds, this seasoning touches upon all three of them. I put it on roast potatoes right when they come out of the oven, I love to toss blistered shishito peppers with it and a squeeze of lime juice, and it’s a great finisher for seafood too.

Look for shichimi togarashi at Japanese grocery stores or order it online.

Rethink Your Spices

by in Food Network Magazine, December 10th, 2013

Rethink Your SpicesSpices like cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg have been used for centuries in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Latin American cooking to bring out rich, meaty flavors in savory dishes. Try adding a pinch or two of your favorite baking spice to a rub for meat, or drop a cinnamon stick into simmering tomato sauce. Just remember: A little goes a long way.

Choose the Right Syrup

by in Food Network Magazine, November 19th, 2013

syrupDon’t be fooled by the label “Grade A” on a bottle of maple syrup: It’s no better than Grade B. Grade B syrup is darker and has a stronger maple flavor; Grade A is milder. We prefer Grade B for cooking (we used it in a Kale-Sesame Chicken Salad for Food Network Magazine). Both grades are more expensive than the imitation stuff (“pancake syrup”), but real maple syrup is worth the splurge.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D.)

Fall Cookbook Favorites

by in Books, November 12th, 2013

Fall Cookbook Favorites 2013by Leila Clifford, Food Network Kitchens Intern

Every season, Food Network looks forward to a new crop of cookbooks and passing our favorites around the office; these are the ones that keep disappearing from people’s desks this fall.

Edward Lee’s new cookbook, Smoke and Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New Southern Kitchen, is an almost-universal favorite for its innovative flavors and new takes on American cuisine. Rob Bleifer, Food Network Kitchens’ executive chef, said of Edward’s book: “Lee’s approach to ingredients often surprises me. Sorghum, for example — sorghum in everything. It’s cool.”

We’re also big fans of Fuchsia Dunlop’s newest book, Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking. “The recipes are very doable and fast, and your pantry doesn’t need to be jam-packed to execute Fuchsia’s dishes,” said Jonathan Milder, culinary research librarian. “She doesn’t dumb it down — she makes you realize how simple Chinese home cooking really is. Give me steamed whole fish any day and chili bean paste on everything.”

Keep reading for more picks

Make Coffee Your Secret Ingredient

by in Food Network Magazine, November 12th, 2013

slow-cooker chiliBakers often use coffee in brownies and cakes to bring out the chocolate flavor. But coffee works just as well in savory recipes — especially slow-cooked dishes like Food Network Magazine‘s Slow-Cooker Chili. Try adding a shot to tomato sauce, gravy or stew, and if you don’t have brewed coffee, just dilute a little instant espresso.