All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

It Came From The Library: 3

by in News, March 20th, 2009

This week I’ve got porkfat on the brain-if not on the tongue. And the latter’s a darn shame, considering what science tells us about the effect on the brain of porkfat on the tongue. Here is the Wall Street Journal Magazine on the neuroscience of lard (note: the following quote may not be suitable for children under 12, or the merely infantile.):

“Try [lardo] alone on the tongue. It melts into a buttery pool as the mouth produces a tide of saliva. The heart quickens. There’s even science to back up that claim: Studies have discovered that when fat is on the tongue the body releases endorphins, which creates an elated mood. Consider it a digestive orgasm.”

And you wonder why I’ve got porkfat on the brain?

This week, the WSJ added its voice to the growing movement to rescue lard from decades of infamy. The paper’s website ran a terrific multimedia package on the growing respect the stuff-the good stuff, that is; not the mass-produced hydrogenated crap-is getting from chefs, sophisticated home cooks, and even nutritionists. I defy anyone to watch Chef Ignacio Mattos prepare lardo from a 2-inch-thick slab of backfat and not feel an aching, atavistic hunger.

And now for some cognitive dissonance:

There are other, far more serious reasons for all of us to have pork on the brain these days, as the NYTimes’ Nicholas Kristof makes clear in two recent editorials. Kristof directs his attention to the emerging scientific consensus that the nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in animal feed is a major factor in the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (‘super-bugs’). His specific concern is with the pork industry’s role in the emergence of a new strain of MRSA, an antibiotic-resistant staph infection that kills more than 18,000 Americans annually. According to one study, seventy percent of all antibiotics in the United States go to healthy livestock. Kristof makes it clear that it’s hard to overstate the threat to public health this poses. Legislation to ban nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in livestock will be introduced in the House this week.

We’ll be following it closely.

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

I worry about this too

by in View All Posts, March 19th, 2009

A worker at a Whole Foods store claims he was fired over a tuna sandwich. The store’s calling it theft, he’s calling it salvaging something from the trash. My major tuna sandwich worry, though? Is that my boss‘s well-documented antipathy for canned tuna (in any form) will someday meet my love for the Amy’s Bread tuna melt, and, well, boom.

Still away, still eating my bodyweight in bread, still slacking on regular posting, but back next week, I swear.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

It Came From The Library: 2

by in News, March 13th, 2009

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:”";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

(Part 2 of a recurring series; see part 1 here)

Add up L.A.’s cult of Kogi, David Chang’s continued superstardom, the rise of Pinkberry and its legion of knockoffs, and a fried-chicken phenomenon, and it’s hard to escape the conclusion that Korean is the cuisine of the moment. It’s a trend that stretches from street food to high-end kitchens. Even chains are getting into the act. California Pizza Kitchen may soon introduce a Korean barbecue beef pizza and Korean fried-chicken salad.

In an excellent Times article, Jennifer Steinhauer explains the rising influence of Korean-Americans in L.A.’s [and the nation's] food culture thus:

“In the last few years, second-generation Korean Angelenos and more recent immigrants have played their own variations on their traditional cuisine and taken it far beyond the boundaries of Korean-dominated neighborhoods. These chefs and entrepreneurs are fueled in large part by tech-boom money here and in South Korea, culinary-school educations and in some cases, their parents’ shifting perspectives about the profession of cooking.”

With their well-funded mixture of youthful energy and technological savvy, and a culinary sophistication unchained by tradition, 2nd generation Koreans can be expected to continue to find inventive ways to expand the market for Korean flavors. They’re a force we can only hope to do more reckoning with.

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

Modest Diplomatic Proposal

by in View All Posts, March 13th, 2009

(image courtesy Gothamist)

From the transcript of Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi’s speech at CSIS yesterday:

“We have worked together to manage complicated and tough regional hotpot issues…”

Well, that’s just fantastic. In the spirit of international collaboration, we’re happy to assist with any regional hotpot tastings; we’re particularly fond of the Sichuan variety, but can try to be unbiased.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

...10...171819...30...