All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

Easter Cupcake Update

by in View All Posts, April 10th, 2009

Some users of our Easter cupcake recipe package have been complaining that the cupcakes fell, flattened and were slightly burnt around the edges. As a result, we decided to re-test and see what was happening. Here’s what we found:

We realized that it’s crucial to process the batter for the extra 2 minutes indicated in the recipe. While the batter will be smooth before this step, processing it for those remaining 2 minutes makes it looser, smoother and pourable.

When testing the cupcakes both with the 2 minute step and without, the results were dramatically different. The unprocessed batter fell and became flat and messy. The processed ones were had a lovely dome shape and were light and fluffy in the center.

See photo below, with unprocessed on the left; processed on the right:

We apologize to anyone who had difficulty with the recipe. We assure you, that if the recipe is carefully followed, you should have excellent results and a very happy Easter cupcake indeed!

Claudia Sidoti, Recipe Developer
Leah Brickley, Test Kitchen Associate

In Season: Fresh Chickpeas

by in In Season, April 9th, 2009

These are fresh chickpeas. We found them in the market downstairs from us for $1.99/pound, so we thought we could afford to experiment with these delicious and nutritious spring legumes. Here’s what we learned:

First start by shelling them (the pods aren’t edible) and then have some fun. They’re good tossed raw into a salad, or steamed for your favorite hummus recipe, or steamed and tossed with butter and parsley, or sautéed with some pancetta and onions and served over pasta with pecorino, or used anywhere you’d use fresh peas. If you like edamame, toss these in good quality extra virgin olive oil and sea salt, then eat them straight out of the pod.

Store them in the refrigerator for up to a week — they do dry out quickly, so it’s best to eat them while fresh.

Claudia Sidoti, Recipe Developer

Critical Food Party Update

by in View All Posts, April 2nd, 2009

When visiting a friend this weekend, somehow we came upon the topic (because that happens) of Food Party, the fabulous web video series I posted about a few months ago.

I learned from my friend, who is knowledgable in the ways of Food Party, that a whole SLEW of new Food Party episodes are currently being shot in short format for the IFC channel. To say I am psyched is a vast, vast understatement.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Cow on the lam(b)

by in View All Posts, April 1st, 2009

Meet Floss. She’s a cow, originally from South Yorkshire, who ran away 9 months ago after having been sold. She managed to spend that entire time on the run, traveling about 60 miles all told, hanging out in a paintball field and stealing hay here and there, before being brought to an animal sanctuary in Norfolk.

As one of her eventual protectors puts it, “She is quite a cow, she remained free by finding some really good hidey-holes.”

Yeah, that’s a pretty awesome cow. And, it would seem, a pretty awesome hidey-hole. [via]

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Take that, Mets!

by in View All Posts, March 30th, 2009

Yesterday a few of my colleagues and I got to experience the latest and greatest thing to happen to the Yankees… Food Network has entered the building. With the help of some very hard working employees here, we now officially have our own concession stand in the premium seating area.

Yesterday was a very soft and successful opening for family and friends. I will admit that I ate almost everything on the menu (and I’m still full) but was very impressed by the success of the food. Come opening day, those who can afford these cushioned seats are in for a very nice treat.

My favs include the hot dog on a pretzel bun with corn relish, the fried fish tacos, and the duck confit pizza. Check out some exclusive pictures of the concession stand and the brand new stadium:

Danielle LaRosa, Assistant Culinary Producer

Not Yet Touched By The Mild Boredom of Order

by in View All Posts, March 27th, 2009

Today, we in the FN Library would like to offer our heartiest congratulations to one Phillip M. Parker of the UK.

If, dear reader, the name means nothing to you, then perhaps his most recent book ‘The 2009-2014 World Outlook for 60-Milligram Containers of Fromage Frais’ will. Perhaps not.

Well, Mr. Parker may have once labored in obscurity, but no longer. As of today, he is the winner of the prestigious 2009 Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Book Title of the Year, sponsored by the UK’s The Bookseller magazine.

Mr. Parker’s magnum opus (it retails for a mere $795) edged out stiff competition from “Curbside Consultation of the Colon,” “The Large Sieve and Its Applications,” “Strip and Knit with Style” and “Techniques for Corrosion Monitoring.” Bravo!

The success of ’60-Milligram Containers…’ and the genius of this book prize (past winners include: “Versailles: The View From Sweden,” “Weeds in a Changing World” and the essential “How to Avoid Huge Ships”) prompted us to look at our library with a fresh set of eyes.

As we browsed the shelves, we noticed more than a few books that could in their time have contended for a Bookseller/Diagram and decided to begin compiling a list. We strongly suspect that books such as ‘A Social History of the American Alligator,’ ‘The Contented Poacher: Tales and Recipes from an Epicure in the Wilderness,’ and ‘Science Experiments You Can Eat’ never got the recognition they were due.

We hereby wish to restore the following titles (if not the works themselves) to their rightful place in the canon:

Beautiful Napkins
Remembrances of Things Passed
Meat and Other Loaves
Onions Love Herbs
Uniform Retail Meat Identity Standards
Melons for the Passionate Grower
A Short History of the American Stomach

There you have it: the FN Library Shortlist. If we’ve neglected any titles of particular merit, we sincerely hope you will bring them to our attention in the comments section below.

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

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