All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

Contain Yourself

by in View All Posts, June 1st, 2009


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If the question “paper or plastic?” drives you to near-psychotic episodes of decidophobia, then do yourself a favor and stop reading now.

Because here’s another one for you: carton (paper), canned (metal), jarred (glass), or pouched (huh?)?

Fortunately, researchers at the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research were brave enough to tackle that one for you.

Their resounding conclusion: based on resource requirements and ecological impact, paperboard cartons are far and away the most environmentally friendly form of food packaging, cutting carbon dioxide emissions and fossil fuel consumption by up to 60% compared with other forms of packaging.

How’s that for a takeaway?

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

Could Totally Go for a Palatschinke Right About Now

by in View All Posts, May 29th, 2009

So I’m kind of a huge fan of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Not because Scripps pays my salary (which it does), nor because it’s my one chance a year to be an unabashed nationalist (which it is), but rather because the food vocabulary is always fascinating.

Both Eat Me Daily and the The Life Vicarious have roundups of this year’s spelled food; TLV takes it a step further with where to find those foods in New York.

Two additional notes:

1) The Caerphilly at Tonjes Farm Dairy (Saturdays at the Union Square Greenmarket) is highly recommended.

2) “Deipnosophist” has the same derivation as “deipnetic,” which I have now used in the blog twice. I’m pretty sure Katherine owes me a drink.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Free Food

by in In Season, May 28th, 2009

If you’ve been reading the Good Food Gardens blog, you’ve probably figured out that I consider gardening the best way to get free food. Not only does food you grow yourself cost virtually nothing after the initial investment of soil and seeds, it’s also the surest way to have quality, locally grown ingredients and make sure that the things you love to eat are always available to you.

Of course, you can’t grow chardonnay smoked sea salt or vanilla beans in your backyard (although I’d love to hear about it if you are), but you can grow a huge variety of lettuces, vegetables, and herbs — exactly the kinds of garden goodies that make it easy to layer summer meals with texture and flavor. Farmers’ markets are also superb, and I still count on real farmers to do the heavy lifting, but even they can’t beat the ease and freshness of picking greens from the garden just hours before dinner.

So you live in a tiny apartment in a big city with no light or backyard? Trust me, you can do it. We’ve proven that anyone can grow a garden by planting one, tended by school-aged kids, between high-rises in the middle of New York City. Okay, my can-do attitude is made significantly easier by the help of Teich Garden Systems, who build our Good Food Gardens, but my own little plot of dirt at the Two Coves Community Garden in Long Island City should be even more convincing. My garden, now packed with strawberries, lemon verbena, rhubarb, Hungarian peppers, and over 10 varieties of lettuces and leafy greens, started out as a packed plot of dead soil just a year ago. Its success is the result of several bags of organic compost tilled into the soil, a few sunny weekends with a shovel, and the occasional rain dance.

Probably the easiest and most prolific garden doesn’t even require a plot of soil at all. The Earth Box, used in schools in Harlem, rooftops in Chicago, and by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations for a international program called the Growing Connection, requires little more than an upfront investment and the desire to grow food—a lot of food. 4 to 6 boxes, some say, can feed a family of four for a summer.

So, what’s your excuse now?

Sarah Copeland, Recipe Developer and Good Food Gardens Spokesperson

Summertime Rum

by in View All Posts, May 27th, 2009

Several of us in the test kitchen were fortunate enough recently to get a visit from Joy Spence, Master Blender for Appleton Rum. Not only did she bring her warm Jamaican disposition, but she also brought two fantastic Jamaican rums from their Estate line of super-premium rums.

Both the 12-year-old and the Estate Reserve were ultra-smooth and rich with aromas of orange, vanilla, honey and nutmeg. While the 12-year-old is best enjoyed neat, perhaps with a little splash of club soda, the Estate Reserve makes some of the tastiest cocktails I’ve consumed in a long time.

These perfect summer beverages are a refreshing relief from overly sweetened tropical drinks. And there’s just something about the scent of rum combined with the classic Caribbean favorites like Ting, lime and ginger that instantly transports me to the beach.

I put these cocktails to the test over the weekend. The result? Instant summer. All my friends needed was some white sand and an ocean breeze.

Claudia Sidoti, Recipe Developer

Appleton-Ting

1.5oz Appleton Estate Reserve Rum
Juice of half a lime
1-2 teaspoons agave nectar
6-8 ounces of Ting (Jamaican grapefruit soda)

Fill a highball glass with ice. Combine the rum with the lime, agave and soda in a cocktail shaker with some ice. Stir gently and pour into a highball glass filled with fresh ice. Garnish with a slice of grapefruit peel.

Jamaican Breeze

1 tablespoon fresh ginger
2 ounces Appleton Estate Reserve Rum
2 ounce Pineapple juice
1 ounce simple syrup
Dash of Angostura bitters

Muddle ginger in a pint glass, then add the rest of the ingredients. Add ice, shake and strain over fresh ice, then garnish with a slice of lime.

Sustainability and Solutions

by in View All Posts, May 26th, 2009

I recently attended the Cooking For Solutions conference at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Other people have written in far more detail, but my quick take is that I’m glad to see the sustainability movement growing upwards and outwards — while simultaneously realizing that speaking to the converted gets you nowhere. There are signs (albeit small ones) that we may be on the road to a mainstream tipping point for sustainability awareness.

Katherine Alford, VP, Test Kitchen

Saving Seeds

by in In Season, May 21st, 2009

Sometimes, when I’m overcome with the heady aroma of a 26-pound Thanksgiving turkey cooking in the middle of May (occupational hazard), my mind wanders out the window and into the nearest garden. Today, this daydreaming was made easy by the arrival of the Seed Savers Exchange Catalog. The catalog is a 101-page testament to the work of the Seed Savers Exchange, an organization that works tirelessly to protect, promote and share our country’s valuable farming heritage.

Specifically, they’re dedicated to preserving the thousands of heirloom varieties of flora that date back before the turn of the 20th century. And they’re a close ally of the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx, where we will be planting our next Good Food Garden this June as part of their summer-long Edible Gardens exhibit.

Heirloom varieties, much like heritage breed animals (like the Berkshire pig or Bourbon Red turkey), are a window into the history of food, marking a vegetable’s migration, immigration and crosspollination from land to land with their names and stories.

The catalog includes 6,200 kinds of tomatoes, 5,100 varieties of beans, and 2,400 peppers. But it isn’t the sheer numbers that delight me. It reads like an epic storybook whose heroes like Russian Giant (garlic) and Hungarian Heart (tomato) live in utopian harmony with the King of the North (pepper) and Sultan’s Golden (beans). And that’s just the beginning of the Edenic paradise. Seed Savers houses the seeds of flowers in every shape and shade, 200 vintage varieties of grapes and 700 different antique apple varieties.

As they say in the catalog, “not bad for a program that started as a little garden in mid-Missouri.” Not bad at all.

Sarah Copeland, Recipe Developer & Good Food Gardens Spokesperson

Isothiocyanates ahoy!

by in View All Posts, May 20th, 2009

So my pal Robert, last heard from here, rears his way-smarter-than-me head again in the pages of Gourmet, this time about how I commandeered his house, backpack full of Greenmarket rhubarb in tow, to make mustard last weekend. I just want to make clear: at no point during said kitchen commandeering did I use the word “isothiocyanates,” hence the way-smarter-than-me-ness, but hey, at least I know what they are now.

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

Sadly, in our era, we're stuck with the Magic Bullet.

by in View All Posts, May 19th, 2009

Anthropologists and palentologists from the Universities of Bordeaux (of all places) and Witwatersrand have come up with evidence that ancient humans may have used bone tools to make smoothies.

This is fairly heartening; I’ve always felt that there had to be some sort of biological smoothie-compulsion at work here, as I’ve never met a single person who actively enjoys smoothies. [via]

Rupa Bhattacharya, Culinary Writer

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