All Posts By Food Network Kitchens

Soften Tough Greens

by in Food Network Magazine, March 25th, 2014

tough greensHearty greens like kale, chard and collards are delicious in salads, but you’ll want to soften them so they aren’t so tough and chewy: Thinly slice the leaves and toss them with dressing (choose one that contains an acidic ingredient, like vinegar or lemon juice, which acts as a tenderizer). Let the greens sit, dressed, until they soften, about 10 minutes.

Infuse Your Grains

by in Food Network Magazine, March 17th, 2014

Pork with Rosemary PolentaNext time you’re making rice, grits or other grains, add some flavor to the cooking liquid. Throw in fresh herbs, dried chiles or a cinnamon stick and let steep a few minutes before adding the grains. Food Network Magazine used a rosemary sprig to infuse the polenta in this weeknight pork dinner (pictured above). If you’re using several ingredients, tie them together with kitchen twine or unwaxed floss so you can easily pull them out later.

Dress Up Your Pasta

by in Food Network Magazine, March 11th, 2014

penne with eggplant sauceTake a tip from the restaurant world and top your pasta with a dollop of ricotta instead of the usual Parmesan. It adds a creamy texture and a slightly sweet flavor — perfect with a tomato-based sauce, like Food Network Magazine’s Penne with Eggplant Sauce (pictured above). Look for fresh ricotta at the market: It’s extra soft and rich.

Freeze Some Bacon

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, February 27th, 2014

Freeze Some BaconBacon is much easier to chop when it’s cold. Keep a stash in the freezer for weeknight meals — separate from the strips you use for breakfast — then just slice and dice straight from the freezer. If you need to separate the strips, microwave on defrost just until you can pull them apart.

Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

Read more

Find a Lean Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, February 13th, 2014

Find a Lean SteakGood news for steak lovers: There are 16 cuts that contain fewer than 10 grams of fat per serving. Some of our favorites are top round, blade and flank because you don’t have to marinate them if you’re short on time. The key to keeping lean steak tender: Cook it to medium-rare and thinly slice it against the grain.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Make a Lighter Cheese Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, February 4th, 2014

How to Make a Lighter Cheese SauceTo create Food Network Magazine‘s trimmed-down mac and cheese (pictured above), we skipped the usual butter-flour roux and used pureed cooked cauliflower as a thickener. The cauliflower doesn’t alter the flavor — it just adds creaminess without the fat. It’s a great way to sneak in fiber and vitamins too. Try the cheese sauce from this recipe on top of veggies or other sides.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Fake Your Fries

by in Food Network Magazine, January 28th, 2014

Fake Your FriesBaked fries can taste as good as the real thing. Here’s the trick: Dip the potato sticks in egg whites whisked with herbs or spices before baking. Spread on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray and coat with more cooking spray, then bake at 425 degrees F until golden. The egg whites dry out in the oven and make the fries extra crisp — without excess oil. Try it out in Food Network Magazine‘s under-500-calories Chicken and Cheese Poutine (pictured above).

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Cook with Tea

by in Food Network Magazine, January 20th, 2014

Cook With TeaTo add flavor without extra calories, turn to your favorite tea: Steep a bag in water and use that for boiling vegetables, cooking grains or poaching chicken and fish (like in Food Network Magazine‘s Green Tea Salmon). Try all kinds of tea, such as black, mint, chai, chamomile or spice. Just don’t steep the tea bag for too long; the flavor can become bitter.

Za’atar — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 14th, 2014

Za'atar - The Next Best Thing You Never Ateby Jacob Schiffman

When I lived in Israel my junior year abroad in college, I started noticing that a lot of my favorite foods had a nutty, floral flavor I hadn’t seen before. I found out it was a Middle Eastern spice blend made of woody herbs (usually thyme and oregano, but traditionally hyssop), sumac and sesame seeds. There I saw it mostly on hummus or on flatbreads, but now I love putting it on roasted vegetables or fish (with a bit of honey), grilled chicken or baked eggs at breakfast. There are regional varieties of za’atar (Jordanian has more sumac and Israeli sometimes includes dill); I like the Israeli style, probably because that’s the first one I tried. Whichever one you prefer, let me know what you like to eat it on.

Find it: Look for it in most good grocery stores and any specialty spice shop.

123...102030...