All Posts By Food Network Kitchen

How to Fake a Pizza

by in Food Network Magazine, July 22nd, 2014

Turn basic flatbread into a quick dinner on the grill: Brush lavash, pocketless pita, naan or other flatbread with oil and grill until marked. Flip, top with cheese and let melt, then remove from the grill and top with arugula, tomatoes, corn or other fresh vegetables, or add some prosciutto or ham. Avoid traditional tomato sauce though — it can make the bread soggy.

Photograph by Justin Walker

How to Pickle Fruit

by in Food Network Magazine, July 8th, 2014

Pickling isn’t just for veggies. Slice any relatively firm fruit like strawberries, grapes, peaches or cherries, then cover with vinegar (balsamic, sherry or white wine), add some sugar and salt and let sit 10 minutes. Drain and add to a salad, like Food Network Magazine’s Pickled Strawberry Salad (pictured above), or serve on grilled meat.

Photograph by Justin Walker

Quick Tip: Max Out Your Grill

by in Food Network Magazine, July 3rd, 2014

If you’re cooking outside and need a stovetop, put a cast-iron skillet or other ovenproof pan right on the grill. Try making a quick sauce for meat this way: Drain your marinade into the pan and bring it to a boil while the meat cooks.

Soften Tough Greens

by in Food Network Magazine, March 25th, 2014

tough greensHearty greens like kale, chard and collards are delicious in salads, but you’ll want to soften them so they aren’t so tough and chewy: Thinly slice the leaves and toss them with dressing (choose one that contains an acidic ingredient, like vinegar or lemon juice, which acts as a tenderizer). Let the greens sit, dressed, until they soften, about 10 minutes.

Infuse Your Grains

by in Food Network Magazine, March 17th, 2014

Pork with Rosemary PolentaNext time you’re making rice, grits or other grains, add some flavor to the cooking liquid. Throw in fresh herbs, dried chiles or a cinnamon stick and let steep a few minutes before adding the grains. Food Network Magazine used a rosemary sprig to infuse the polenta in this weeknight pork dinner (pictured above). If you’re using several ingredients, tie them together with kitchen twine or unwaxed floss so you can easily pull them out later.

Dress Up Your Pasta

by in Food Network Magazine, March 11th, 2014

penne with eggplant sauceTake a tip from the restaurant world and top your pasta with a dollop of ricotta instead of the usual Parmesan. It adds a creamy texture and a slightly sweet flavor — perfect with a tomato-based sauce, like Food Network Magazine’s Penne with Eggplant Sauce (pictured above). Look for fresh ricotta at the market: It’s extra soft and rich.

Freeze Some Bacon

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, February 27th, 2014

Freeze Some BaconBacon is much easier to chop when it’s cold. Keep a stash in the freezer for weeknight meals — separate from the strips you use for breakfast — then just slice and dice straight from the freezer. If you need to separate the strips, microwave on defrost just until you can pull them apart.

Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

Read more

Find a Lean Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, February 13th, 2014

Find a Lean SteakGood news for steak lovers: There are 16 cuts that contain fewer than 10 grams of fat per serving. Some of our favorites are top round, blade and flank because you don’t have to marinate them if you’re short on time. The key to keeping lean steak tender: Cook it to medium-rare and thinly slice it against the grain.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

123...102030...