All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Fire and Ice: How to Make Grilled Lemonade

by in Food Network Magazine, July 18th, 2013

grilled lemonadeWe’re all for throwing new things onto the grill, but we were skeptical of grilled lemonade when we heard about the trend. After trying it, we’re sold: Grilling the lemons makes the drink taste caramelized and slightly smoky. To make a pitcher, dip the cut sides of 16 halved lemons in sugar and grill until marked, about 5 minutes; let cool. Simmer 1 1/4 cups sugar with 1 3/4 cups water and a pinch of salt until dissolved; let cool. Squeeze the lemons through a strainer into a pitcher; stir in the sugar syrup, some ice and a few of the grilled lemons.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

DIY Ice Pops

by in Food Network Magazine, July 11th, 2013

freezie popsAmericans have been squeezing ice pops out of plastic tubes since Fla-Vor-Ice was invented more than 40 years ago. But we had to wait awhile to make them ourselves: For years the sleeves were tricky to find outside the Philippines, where homemade push-up pops are super popular. Now you can get the bags stateside, thanks to an ice-pop fan who recently started importing them. Fill with any fruit juice, tie the top and freeze. $10 for 100; icecandybags.com

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

May’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 25th, 2013

name this dish frozen drink

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include corn-crab deviled eggs (winning name: “Fish and Chicks“), cheese fries (“The Smotherload“) and even a stuffed cupcake (“Heart of the Batter“). In the May 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this frozen drink (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Margajito
Nancy Boardman
Naples, Fla.

Borderlime
Mary Argyros
St. Louis

More favorites and the winner announced

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, June 21st, 2013

Food Network Magazine June Cover
Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the June issue of Food Network Magazine.

Ree, what meals do you regularly cook ahead — or double and then freeze?
Brenda Erwin from Hurst, Texas

My Chicken Spaghetti recipe is definitely one of those casseroles I tend to double — and often triple — so I can have extra pans for the fridge. Lasagna is another one: If I’m going to cook up a big meat sauce and boil noodles, I might as well make twice the amount. The mess isn’t that much bigger and I get more bang for my buck. Some other things I love to freeze: sloppy joe mix, spaghetti sauce, taco meat and even pulled pork or beef brisket. If you wrap them carefully, they’ll do just fine in the freezer.
Ree Drummond

Keep reading

Grate Your Garlic

by in Food Network Magazine, June 18th, 2013

grated garlicHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

If you’re using raw garlic in a dish, grate the cloves on a fine grater. It’s much faster than mincing, and you’ll end up with a mix of garlic juice and tiny bits of the clove that distribute evenly in salsas, dressings and other uncooked dishes. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about biting into a big chunk.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

How to Make Sangria Floats

by in Food Network Magazine, June 13th, 2013

Sangria Floats

Try a new take on sangria this summer: sparkling red wine poured over fruit sorbet. You can prepare it in about 30 seconds — no fruit chopping required. For these, we paired lambrusco (sparkling Italian red wine) with scoops of lemon, peach and orange sorbets. Try your own flavor combo or just drink the lambrusco by itself: It’s the perfect wine for a cookout.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Fire Up the Broiler

by in Food Network Magazine, June 11th, 2013

Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream SauceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Broiling is a great hands-off way to cook fish: You’ll get a nice caramelized crust on top, and you won’t need to flip the fillets. (Check out Food Network Magazine‘s Broiled Salmon With Tomato Cream Sauce, pictured above.) Be sure to preheat the broiler first, then cook the fish for six to eight minutes per inch of thickness. If you line the pan with foil, cleanup is super easy.

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, June 5th, 2013

May issue of Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions from the May issue of Food Network Magazine.

Guy, recipes often ask for different kinds of mustard — dry, ground, yellow. Does it really matter which I use?
Anja Martin from Thrall, Texas

Yes, it does matter. The reason has to do with intensity. It’s best to use the one the recipe calls for the first time around and then take the liberty to tweak to your taste after. For me, the hotter the mustard, the better!
— Guy Fieri

Sunny, some men hate it when their significant others pick food off their plates — and my man is no exception. But for some reason, there is always a bite on his plate that calls my name. How do I take it off his plate without irritating him?
Kathleen Sebastian from Richmond, Calif.

Keep reading

Buy Frozen Brown Rice

by in Food Network Magazine, June 4th, 2013

frozen brown riceHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

One of our favorite new supermarket finds is frozen brown rice. It’s fully cooked and ready to use: You can add it straight from the freezer to soups, stews and stir-fries and saving about 45 minutes of cooking time.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

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