All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Star Kitchen: Jessica Seinfeld

by in Food Network Magazine, August 24th, 2013

Jessica Seinfield's Kitchen

Check out Jessica Seinfeld’s guesthouse kitchen, then pick up some of her finds for your own kitchen.

gallon montana jar Jessica keeps big containers like these 2 1/2-gallon Montana jars stocked with bagels, chips and oranges for her guests. $35; anchorhocking.com

 

 

 

plate shelf Hang a plate shelf like Jessica’s: It shows off her pieces, plus guests know just where to put everything. $70; ikea.com

 

 

 

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Sew Much Food

by in Events, Food Network Magazine, August 21st, 2013

crochet foodWe thought we had seen it all in the fake-food world, but crafters are cranking out something new and totally irresistible: crocheted snacks. Inspired by the popular Japanese art of amigurumi (crocheting small dolls and toys), American knitters have been dreaming up all sorts of fun meals, like this burger, dog and fries ($12/hot dog, $22/burger and fries; etsy.com). You can find free patterns online, or better yet, learn from the pros: This month, three big knitting stores — ImagiKnit in San Francisco (imagiknit.com), Purl Soho in New York City (purlsoho.com) and The Little Knittery in Los Angeles (thelittleknittery.com) — will launch food-design crochet classes.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, July 30th, 2013

JulyAugust 2013 cover

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the July/August issue of Food Network Magazine.

Sunny, what is the perfect rub for slow-roasted pork butt and ribs?
John R. Verdensky via Facebook

The butt, or shoulder, is my favorite thing to slow-roast. Pork accepts flavor really well, so it’s fun to tailor the seasoning blend to your meal. The easiest is my grandma’s recipe, which is just Old Bay, sweet paprika, garlic and onion powder. I also like pumpkin pie spice blends or curry blends with plenty of salt and pepper. For ribs, I’m a daughter of the Carolinas, so I lean toward vinegar in my sauce. Or try rubbing the ribs with a blend of chili powder, lime juice and honey.
—Sunny Anderson

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Shock Value: How to Keep Summer Produce Fresh

by in Food Network Magazine, July 25th, 2013

produceFood scientists think they’ve found a way to extend the life of fresh produce: Shock it in warm water. Researchers at The Cooking Lab, a research facility started by Modernist Cuisine author Nathan Myhrvold, report that submerging fruit and vegetables in hot water slows the production of the gases and enzymes that turn them brown. Just fill a large pot with hot tap water (between 122 degrees F and 131 degrees F) and soak the produce for two to three minutes. Then drain, dry and refrigerate it as usual. Your fruit and veggies might taste better, too. W. Wayt Gibbs from the lab says that, in the study, they found a slight increase in crunchiness.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Fire and Ice: How to Make Grilled Lemonade

by in Food Network Magazine, July 18th, 2013

grilled lemonadeWe’re all for throwing new things onto the grill, but we were skeptical of grilled lemonade when we heard about the trend. After trying it, we’re sold: Grilling the lemons makes the drink taste caramelized and slightly smoky. To make a pitcher, dip the cut sides of 16 halved lemons in sugar and grill until marked, about 5 minutes; let cool. Simmer 1 1/4 cups sugar with 1 3/4 cups water and a pinch of salt until dissolved; let cool. Squeeze the lemons through a strainer into a pitcher; stir in the sugar syrup, some ice and a few of the grilled lemons.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

DIY Ice Pops

by in Food Network Magazine, July 11th, 2013

freezie popsAmericans have been squeezing ice pops out of plastic tubes since Fla-Vor-Ice was invented more than 40 years ago. But we had to wait awhile to make them ourselves: For years the sleeves were tricky to find outside the Philippines, where homemade push-up pops are super popular. Now you can get the bags stateside, thanks to an ice-pop fan who recently started importing them. Fill with any fruit juice, tie the top and freeze. $10 for 100; icecandybags.com

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

May’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, June 25th, 2013

name this dish frozen drink

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include corn-crab deviled eggs (winning name: “Fish and Chicks“), cheese fries (“The Smotherload“) and even a stuffed cupcake (“Heart of the Batter“). In the May 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this frozen drink (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Margajito
Nancy Boardman
Naples, Fla.

Borderlime
Mary Argyros
St. Louis

More favorites and the winner announced

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, June 21st, 2013

Food Network Magazine June Cover
Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the June issue of Food Network Magazine.

Ree, what meals do you regularly cook ahead — or double and then freeze?
Brenda Erwin from Hurst, Texas

My Chicken Spaghetti recipe is definitely one of those casseroles I tend to double — and often triple — so I can have extra pans for the fridge. Lasagna is another one: If I’m going to cook up a big meat sauce and boil noodles, I might as well make twice the amount. The mess isn’t that much bigger and I get more bang for my buck. Some other things I love to freeze: sloppy joe mix, spaghetti sauce, taco meat and even pulled pork or beef brisket. If you wrap them carefully, they’ll do just fine in the freezer.
Ree Drummond

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Grate Your Garlic

by in Food Network Magazine, June 18th, 2013

grated garlicHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

If you’re using raw garlic in a dish, grate the cloves on a fine grater. It’s much faster than mincing, and you’ll end up with a mix of garlic juice and tiny bits of the clove that distribute evenly in salsas, dressings and other uncooked dishes. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about biting into a big chunk.

(Photograph by Julia Cawley/Studio D)

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