All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Tour Nadia G.’s Kitchen

by in Food Network Magazine, September 14th, 2013

Nadia G's kitchen

Check out Nadia G.’s Montreal kitchen, then pick up some of her finds for your own kitchen.

black goblets

 

 

 

Black goblets appeal to Nadia’s dark side. $16, Mario Luca Giusti; seed387.com

brasserie plates

 

 

Nadia’s Brasserie Plates are modeled after those used in restaurants in France during the 1920s. $33 for a 9½-inch plate, Pillivuyt USA; 125west.com

 

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You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, September 6th, 2013

September 2013 Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the September 2013 issue of Food Network Magazine.

Giada, your daughter, Jade, has such a mature palate. As the mother of an 8-month-old, I wonder if you have any advice to ensure my child will like different cuisines and not just kid stuff.
Ann Kording from Woodbridge, Va.

You can’t feed her kid stuff. As soon as she starts eating solids, you need to make her real food. Eight months is a little young because there are a lot of things she can’t eat yet, but as soon as possible she needs to eat what you eat. I grew up eating adult food with my parents, and Jade eats what we eat, too.
Giada De Laurentiis

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Fun Cooking: Breakfast Break

by in Food Network Magazine, September 2nd, 2013

Cereal BrittlePop quiz: How many boxes of cereal are in your pantry? Assuming that you’re sitting on a surplus like most families, we have just the recipe for you: cereal brittle. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and brush with vegetable oil. In a saucepan, combine 2 tablespoons water and 1 cup sugar. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; cook, swirling the pan but not stirring, until amber, 6 to 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in 1 cup cereal (we used a mix of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Kix and Cheerios); pour onto the prepared baking sheet and spread with a rubber spatula. Let cool completely, then break into pieces.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Hot or Cold Spinach Dip: Which Do You Prefer?

by in Food Network Magazine, August 30th, 2013

spinach dipFood Network Magazine wants to know which side you’re on. Vote in the poll below and tell FN Dish whether you prefer to nosh on hot or cold spinach dip.

Star Kitchen: Jessica Seinfeld

by in Food Network Magazine, August 24th, 2013

Jessica Seinfield's Kitchen

Check out Jessica Seinfeld’s guesthouse kitchen, then pick up some of her finds for your own kitchen.

gallon montana jar Jessica keeps big containers like these 2 1/2-gallon Montana jars stocked with bagels, chips and oranges for her guests. $35; anchorhocking.com

 

 

 

plate shelf Hang a plate shelf like Jessica’s: It shows off her pieces, plus guests know just where to put everything. $70; ikea.com

 

 

 

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Sew Much Food

by in Events, Food Network Magazine, August 21st, 2013

crochet foodWe thought we had seen it all in the fake-food world, but crafters are cranking out something new and totally irresistible: crocheted snacks. Inspired by the popular Japanese art of amigurumi (crocheting small dolls and toys), American knitters have been dreaming up all sorts of fun meals, like this burger, dog and fries ($12/hot dog, $22/burger and fries; etsy.com). You can find free patterns online, or better yet, learn from the pros: This month, three big knitting stores — ImagiKnit in San Francisco (imagiknit.com), Purl Soho in New York City (purlsoho.com) and The Little Knittery in Los Angeles (thelittleknittery.com) — will launch food-design crochet classes.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Magazine, July 30th, 2013

JulyAugust 2013 cover

Food Network stars answer your burning questions in the July/August issue of Food Network Magazine.

Sunny, what is the perfect rub for slow-roasted pork butt and ribs?
John R. Verdensky via Facebook

The butt, or shoulder, is my favorite thing to slow-roast. Pork accepts flavor really well, so it’s fun to tailor the seasoning blend to your meal. The easiest is my grandma’s recipe, which is just Old Bay, sweet paprika, garlic and onion powder. I also like pumpkin pie spice blends or curry blends with plenty of salt and pepper. For ribs, I’m a daughter of the Carolinas, so I lean toward vinegar in my sauce. Or try rubbing the ribs with a blend of chili powder, lime juice and honey.
—Sunny Anderson

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Shock Value: How to Keep Summer Produce Fresh

by in Food Network Magazine, July 25th, 2013

produceFood scientists think they’ve found a way to extend the life of fresh produce: Shock it in warm water. Researchers at The Cooking Lab, a research facility started by Modernist Cuisine author Nathan Myhrvold, report that submerging fruit and vegetables in hot water slows the production of the gases and enzymes that turn them brown. Just fill a large pot with hot tap water (between 122 degrees F and 131 degrees F) and soak the produce for two to three minutes. Then drain, dry and refrigerate it as usual. Your fruit and veggies might taste better, too. W. Wayt Gibbs from the lab says that, in the study, they found a slight increase in crunchiness.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

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