All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Snack Pockets From Food Network Kitchens

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, October 10th, 2011

croque pockets
Microwaveable snack pockets are one of those foods people love to hate on. They’re often thought of as a last-resort after school snack or a guilt-laden solution to the midnight munchies. The comedian Jim Gaffigan even has a pretty hilarious skit about them (watch it here).  But the truth is a lot of people secretly love them. It’s not hard to understand why. I mean, they’re hearty, easy to eat and convenient.

Here in the Food Network Kitchens, we wanted to capitalize on all the great things about snack pockets and fix all the bad things — like the processed, overly salty, not-so-good for you fillings and often soggy crust.

Find your favorite filling »

Fruit Leather Roll-Ups — Food Network Kitchens

by in Behind the Scenes, September 29th, 2011

fruit leather roll-ups
For recent story on old-school fruit leather roll-ups in Food Network Magazine’s September issue, chefs in Food Network Kitchens tried all sorts of combos, but apple-ginger, spicy mango and raspberry-vanilla were clear favorites. Don’t ask for pineapple, “No matter how many times recipe developers tried it, it just wouldn’t set.”

Get the recipes and check out behind-the-scenes photos »

A Tuscan Cookout — Weekend Cooking

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, September 9th, 2011

florentine-style steaks
Each month, Food Network Kitchen chefs put more than 100 recipes to the test for Food Network Magazine. Every recipe goes through at least two to three rounds of testing, plus a round of cross-testing, where the recipe goes through one final run-through to make sure it works as it is written in final form.

“We make sure language, timing and visual cues are correct,” says Andrea Albin, a Food Network Kitchens recipe tester.

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Snacks That Taste Better Fried

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, September 6th, 2011

fried oreos
It’s state fair season, so for the September issue of Food Network Magazine, chefs in Food Network Kitchens raided the fridge and pantry and deep-fried for days, looking for hits and misses for the story, “Can You Fry It?”. There were a few explosions — marshmallows melted, gumdrops sank to the bottom of the fryer, and the iceberg lettuce came out looking like a sea creature.

Fried Snickers, muffins, bananas and more (with photos) »

June’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, August 20th, 2011

pork-bellied poppers
Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page “Name this Dish” contest. Previous dishes include brownies (winner name: “Brownie Rubble”), ice cream burgers (“BRRR-gers”) and even an over-the-top ham sandwich (“The Hammy Down”). In the June 2011 issue, we asked you to dream up names for pork-stuffed jalapeno peppers. Some of our favorites were “Pig Tails,” “Pigs in an Electric Blanket” and “Squealing Hots.” But the winner, Cathy Larson of Long Beach, CA, really hit the mark when she dubbed them “Pork-Bellied Poppers.”

Take a stab at naming this month’s recipe: cookies »

The Perfect Iced Tea — Food Network Kitchens

by in Behind the Scenes, Food Network Magazine, August 19th, 2011

perfect iced tea
To come up with Food Network Magazine’s perfect iced tea recipe, Food Network Kitchens recipe testers compared hot- and cold-brewed black, herbal and green teas, testing each with both tea bags and loose tea to ensure accurate results.

“Although the cold brew did have a nice, pristine flavor, you ended up having to use so much more tea,” recipe tester Andrea Albin, recipe tester, says.

Get the perfect iced tea recipe »

50 States, 50 Pizzas

by in Food Network Magazine, August 11th, 2011

50 states 50 pizzas
Before you click through these pizzas, let’s be clear: In regard to pizza, we, the editors and writers of this story, do not discriminate. When we set out six months ago to find the greatest pizzas in America, we did not insist on thin crust over thick or red sauce over white. We didn’t even care if the pizzas were round. We just needed them to be awesome.

Inevitably, some of you will be alarmed by our choices, shocked that so-and-so was snubbed because their crust has the perfect crunch or their cheese oozes just so. But passionate disagreements about pizza reveal one great truth: There is no single best way to make it. In the bellow gallery, you will see by-the-book classics right next to brash pies that break every rule.

But all of them have one important thing in common: They’re well worth the trip.

View the gallery: 50 States, 50 Pizzas

Two Ways to Use: Root Beer

by in Recipes, July 22nd, 2011

root beer bundt cake

Every month, Food Network Magazine puts chefs from Food Network Kitchens to the test: Create new recipes made with common supermarket products like pretzels and ice cream cones.

There are numerous brands of root beer available to consumers, and no one recipe is the same. Ingredients like allspice, birch bark, vanilla bean and licorice give this classic drink a unique taste that pairs so well with vanilla ice cream. This month, Claudia Sidoti and Dave Mechlowicz are tackling and transforming the sweet, carbonated soda pop into a cake and grown-up root beer float.

Recipe: Root Beer Bundt Cake (pictured above)
Claudia says: “I love root beer in just about every form. It tastes great with chocolate!”

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In The Know: Good Cookin’ Good Lookin’

by in Food Network Magazine, March 20th, 2010

beauty products

Take a cue from these busy chefs and search your kitchen for makeshift beauty products.

Kelly English, Chef/owner, Restaurant Iris, Memphis

  • BEER – “As a broke college student who had to choose between beer and shampoo, I found you can wash your hair with beer—it strips away impurities built up on your scalp. Just pour the beer on in the shower. But be sure to rinse it out well or you might smell less than appropriate.”

Sue Zemanick, Executive chef, Gautreau’s, New Orleans

  • NUTS – “Nuts are a key ingredient in lots of our desserts, and I’ve noticed they do wonders for my skin. I soak some almonds, Brazil nuts, macadamia nuts or hazelnuts in water overnight to soften. Then I puree them in a blender with a little bit of water and strain them. I use the nut milk as a body and face scrub: It makes my skin really shiny.”

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