All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Peel Garlic in a Flash

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

garlic

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Smashing whole garlic cloves is the best way to peel them: Place the cloves on a cutting board, hold the flat side of a chef’s knife on top and give it a firm whack with the heel of your other hand. Use just enough force to split the skin and crack open the cloves; if you pulverize the garlic with a heavy-handed thud, it will be harder to peel.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

October’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

Autumn Wrap
Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include tricolor potatoes (winning name: “United Tates of America”), a hot dog sandwich (“Triple Dog Dare”) and even a portable treat (“Berried Treasure”). In the October 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this autumn wrap (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Fall Tied Up!
Caitlin Dowswell
Vallejo, Calif.

Fall Foldiage
Michelle Burwell
Desert Hills, Ariz.

More favorites and the winner announced

Join the Sweet Potato Craze

by in Food Network Magazine, November 15th, 2012

Sweet Potatoes

America’s obsession with sweets isn’t always a bad thing. We’re eating more vitamin-packed sweet potatoes than ever: about seven pounds a year per person, up from only 3.8 pounds in 2002. It helps that fast-food restaurants, including Wendy’s and Burger King, have put them on the menu. And celebrities are touting them, too: Oprah Winfrey says they’re one of her favorite foods, and Glee‘s Matthew Morrison follows a sweet potato-only diet before photo shoots. Get your fill with Guy Fieri’s Whiskey-Glazed Sweet Potatoes and Ree Drummond’s Soul Sweet ‘Taters, then vote for your favorite.

Press Your Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, November 13th, 2012

Steak on cutting board

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Next time you cook a steak on the stovetop, place a cast-iron skillet or other heavy pan on top of the meat while it’s cooking. The extra weight will prevent the steak from curling around the edges and help give it an even sear. If you don’t have a heavy pan, you can use a regular one and weigh it down with a few cans of tomatoes or beans.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

How to Bake a Better Potato

by in Food Network Magazine, November 6th, 2012

steak and blue cheese potatoes

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To improve your baked potatoes inside and out, brush the skin with olive oil or melted butter before baking; it’ll crisp the skin. And don’t wrap potatoes in foil — just prick them all over with a fork (to help steam escape) and bake at 375 degrees F until tender, about 50 minutes. To speed up the cooking process, start the potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes, then brush with oil and finish in the oven for 10 minutes, like we did for the Steak With Blue Cheese Potatoes recipe pictured above.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Mix Up Your Onions

by in Food Network Magazine, October 29th, 2012

Shallot

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Keep red onions on hand: They’re milder than yellow or white ones, so you can eat them raw. Plus, you can substitute them for shallots in most recipes, like the vodka sauce in this Penne With Vodka Sauce recipe. Use 1/2 small red onion for every large shallot.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

Flavor Your Mayo

by in Food Network Magazine, October 23rd, 2012

Tuna Tostadas

Hot tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Add a twist to sandwiches or tacos with custom mayonnaise: Mix plain mayo with citrus zest or juice, fresh herbs, chopped olives or a condiment like pesto or Sriracha. (We made chile-lime mayo for the tuna tostadas pictured above.) Keep the leftovers in the fridge, covered, for up to three days, but taste before reusing: The flavors can intensify after a day or two, so you may need to mellow it out with more mayo.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Candy Man: How to Make Alton Brown’s Candy Corn

by in Food Network Magazine, Holidays, October 19th, 2012

candy corn

Kids who ring Alton Brown’s doorbell on Halloween don’t get the usual fun-size candy bar. Over the years, the Browns have handed out homemade taffy, candied apples, headless marshmallow bunnies — you name it. But of all of Alton’s Halloween creations, nothing tops his candy corn. As usual, Alton and the Good Eats team approached the project as a science experiment: They created the recipe in April but used a dehumidifier in the kitchen to mimic crisp fall air. Alton also tested every imaginable food coloring before choosing gel paste. The resulting recipe, which appears in his latest cookbook, Good Eats 3: The Later Years, is easy — and super impressive, Alton says. “When you tell people you’ve made candy corn, they say, ‘Holy cow, you made your own?!’” Plus, a lot of candy corn haters realize they actually like the stuff when it’s homemade. For the record, Alton will take his candy corn any which way. “I’m not a snob,” he says. “I won’t turn down the store-bought stuff.”

Alton says the candy corn tastes better after a few days: It dries out a little and becomes chewier, and the flavor intensifies. Find out how to make it with this step-by-step.

September’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, October 17th, 2012

Name this dish dessert spread

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include tricolor potatoes (winning name: “United Tates of America”), a hot dog sandwich (“Triple Dog Dare”) and even bite-sized cakes (“Swirly Temples”). In the September 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this dessert spread (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Tiers of Schmears
Jennifer Joos
Opelika, Ala.

Traveling Trifle
Alice Kolman
Hampstead, Md.

More favorites and the winner announced

Keep Cooked Rice on Hand

by in Food Network Magazine, October 16th, 2012

corn fried rice

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Leftover rice comes in handy when you’re throwing together a quick dish, like Food Network Magazine‘s Corn Fried Rice, or when you need to bulk up a stir-fry or soup. Cook a big batch, cool it, then freeze it in a microwave-safe storage container for up to 1 month. To thaw, sprinkle the rice with water and microwave, covered, until heated through.