All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Fresh Pick: A New Gift Box Idea

by in Food Network Magazine, Holidays, December 13th, 2012

Gift Basket

Step up your usual wrapping job this year by presenting gifts in these farmer’s berry baskets ($2.50 for six, plus $8 shipping; bakeitpretty.com). They’re just like the ones from the market and they’re the perfect size for homemade truffles or small presents like these polka-dot napkins from Anthropologie ($24 for four; anthropologie.com). The baskets are available in both pint and half-pint sizes.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Preheat Your Roasting Pan

by in Food Network Magazine, December 11th, 2012

Roasted Carrots and Peas

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To cut down on roasting time for dense vegetables like carrots and potatoes, preheat a metal baking sheet or roasting pan in the oven for at least 10 minutes. When the food hits the pan, it will get a blast of heat that jump-starts the cooking.

Finish Pasta in the Sauce

by in Food Network Magazine, December 4th, 2012

Pasta

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Drain your pasta when it’s just al dente, then cook it for a minute or 2 more in a skillet with the sauce. This lets the pasta absorb flavor from the sauce and it helps the sauce cling to the pasta. Try it with any simmered sauce (not pesto or carbonara), and if the sauce gets too thick, thin it with some of the pasta cooking water.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Starring Roll: Justin Warner’s Mashed Potato-Peanut Butter Candy

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

Justin Warner

Justin Warner doesn’t play by the rules. He eats jellyfish on Thanksgiving, serves cold-pizza terrine at his Brooklyn restaurant and writes rap songs about wine. But when Alton Brown, Giada De Laurentiis and Bobby Flay had to choose their teams of aspiring stars for the most recent season of Food Network Star, Justin’s unconventional approach caught Alton’s eye. Alton picked Justin for his group, and throughout the season Justin was a rebel, presenting wild combos like peanut butter–stuffed dates topped with seaweed. In the end, after 4.5 million viewers voted, Justin emerged as the winner. He says Alton’s guidance made all the difference. “It was a true mentorship,” Justin says. “Day one, Alton said, ‘No apologies.’ That’s how you win.”

Although Justin has been busy planning his new show (coming this fall), we managed to pull him aside for a quick Thanksgiving assignment: Come up with a fun new way to use leftover mashed potatoes. Justin took an old-fashioned candy idea and turned it on its head. Traditional mashed-potato candy is made with peanut butter, but Justin added umeboshi paste (Japanese plum paste) as a twist on peanut butter and jelly. Try the recipe (pictured after the jump).

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Peel Garlic in a Flash

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

garlic

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Smashing whole garlic cloves is the best way to peel them: Place the cloves on a cutting board, hold the flat side of a chef’s knife on top and give it a firm whack with the heel of your other hand. Use just enough force to split the skin and crack open the cloves; if you pulverize the garlic with a heavy-handed thud, it will be harder to peel.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

October’s “Name This Dish” Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, November 20th, 2012

Autumn Wrap
Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include tricolor potatoes (winning name: “United Tates of America”), a hot dog sandwich (“Triple Dog Dare”) and even a portable treat (“Berried Treasure”). In the October 2012 issue, we asked you to dream up names for this autumn wrap (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Fall Tied Up!
Caitlin Dowswell
Vallejo, Calif.

Fall Foldiage
Michelle Burwell
Desert Hills, Ariz.

More favorites and the winner announced

Join the Sweet Potato Craze

by in Food Network Magazine, November 15th, 2012

Sweet Potatoes

America’s obsession with sweets isn’t always a bad thing. We’re eating more vitamin-packed sweet potatoes than ever: about seven pounds a year per person, up from only 3.8 pounds in 2002. It helps that fast-food restaurants, including Wendy’s and Burger King, have put them on the menu. And celebrities are touting them, too: Oprah Winfrey says they’re one of her favorite foods, and Glee‘s Matthew Morrison follows a sweet potato-only diet before photo shoots. Get your fill with Guy Fieri’s Whiskey-Glazed Sweet Potatoes and Ree Drummond’s Soul Sweet ‘Taters, then vote for your favorite.

Press Your Steak

by in Food Network Magazine, November 13th, 2012

Steak on cutting board

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Next time you cook a steak on the stovetop, place a cast-iron skillet or other heavy pan on top of the meat while it’s cooking. The extra weight will prevent the steak from curling around the edges and help give it an even sear. If you don’t have a heavy pan, you can use a regular one and weigh it down with a few cans of tomatoes or beans.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

How to Bake a Better Potato

by in Food Network Magazine, November 6th, 2012

steak and blue cheese potatoes

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To improve your baked potatoes inside and out, brush the skin with olive oil or melted butter before baking; it’ll crisp the skin. And don’t wrap potatoes in foil — just prick them all over with a fork (to help steam escape) and bake at 375 degrees F until tender, about 50 minutes. To speed up the cooking process, start the potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes, then brush with oil and finish in the oven for 10 minutes, like we did for the Steak With Blue Cheese Potatoes recipe pictured above.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Mix Up Your Onions

by in Food Network Magazine, October 29th, 2012

Shallot

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Keep red onions on hand: They’re milder than yellow or white ones, so you can eat them raw. Plus, you can substitute them for shallots in most recipes, like the vodka sauce in this Penne With Vodka Sauce recipe. Use 1/2 small red onion for every large shallot.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)