All Posts By Food Network Magazine

Make a Healthier Soup

by in Food Network Magazine, February 1st, 2013

Chicken and Quinoa SoupHot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Sneak a little more fiber into your favorite soups: Use whole grains instead of white rice or noodles. We chose quinoa for the Chicken and Quinoa Soup in the January/February issue of Food Network Magazine because it cooks in just 15 minutes and adds a nice nutty flavor to the dish. You can also try quick-cooking barley, short-grain brown rice or whole-grain pasta in other brothy soups.

Spice Up Your Avocados

by in Food Network Magazine, January 22nd, 2013

Avocado
Americans buy a shocking amount of avocados in January. About 145 million pounds flew off the shelves this time last year, a 15 percent increase over 2011, and we’re guessing almost all of them got mashed and turned into guacamole. While there’s no shame in that, we figured you might want to try something new: Halve an avocado and remove the pit and peel, then press into the rounded side seeds, spices or finely chopped bacon. Slice and serve on crostini or salad.

Image from left to right: Poppy seeds and salt, bacon and smoked paprika, Old Bay Seasoning and salt

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)

Boost Meals With Smoked Fish

by in Food Network Magazine, January 19th, 2013

Curried Rice With Smoked Trout

Hot Tips for Healthy Cooking From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Smoked fish is an easy way to add flavor, protein and healthy fats to a dish, and you only a little. We used just 1 ounce of fish per serving for the Curried Rice With Smoked Trout from the January/February issue of Food Network Magazine. Keep some smoked salmon or trout on hand (it stays fresh for about a week in the fridge) and try it on a sandwich or salad, or toss it with pasta.

Hot Spots: Three Unique American Chilis

by in Food Network Magazine, View All Posts, January 16th, 2013

Texas Bowl of RedWarm up with three regional chilis and see why each has a cult following. The experts share their recipes with Food Network Magazine.

In Texas, chili is practically a religion, with one important tenet: Keep it simple. That means no beans and, often, no tomatoes — just beef and spices. “Texas red,” as the locals call it, gets its distinctive dark red color from a big shot of chili powder (a mix of spices that usually includes paprika, cumin and cayenne). Texans cook it low and slow, just like their barbecue, until the chili gets thick and the meat is super tender. Texas Chili Parlor in Austin serves one of the most well-known versions: The Austin American-Statesman called it “legendary,” and owner Scott Zublin says his customers put away up to 250 gallons every week. You can order it mild, hot or extra-hot; the recipe Zublin gave us makes a moderately spicy chili. To turn the heat up or down, just adjust the amount of chili powder. 1409 Lavaca St.; txchiliparlor.com

Try the recipe: Texas Bowl of Red (pictured above)

Read more

Speed Up Caramelized Onions

by in Food Network Magazine, December 26th, 2012

French Onion Burger

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Caramelizing onions can take a while, but adding a big pinch of sugar will make them brown faster. The extra sugar caramelizes along with the onions’ natural sugars, helping the onions get brown in a hurry. We used this shortcut for the burger topping in Food Network Magazine‘s French Onion Burgers.

Trim Beans in a Flash

by in Food Network Magazine, December 18th, 2012

Green Beans
Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Green beans don’t need to be trimmed on both ends — just the stem end. For fast trimming, line up a handful of raw beans on a cutting board with the stem ends facing your knife, then push them into a line against the knife and make one long cut.

Book-Smart: Food Network Stars’ Favorite Cookbooks

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, December 15th, 2012

Favorite Cookbooks

Food Network stars reveal their favorite cookbooks. Give one (or all!) to the chef in your house.

ALTON’S PICK:
The Fireside Cook Book
Alton Brown’s most beloved cookbook, written by James Beard, isn’t about food science or crazy gadgets — it’s an old-school American classic. “It’s a clear portrait of American cuisine at its post World War II height, before the rise of California or fusion cuisine, or any cuisine for that matter,” he says. $30, Simon & Schuster

MARC’S PICK:
The French Laundry Cookbook
Iron Chef Marc Forgione loves Thomas Keller’s fine-dining bible as much for how it looks as for what it says. “When I first picked up this book, I realized I had never seen food look like that before,” Marc says. “Reading Keller’s stories about ingredients, purveyors and staff helped me confirm that I wanted to be a chef.” $50, Artisan

Keep reading for more Iron Chef picks

Fresh Pick: A New Gift Box Idea

by in Food Network Magazine, Holidays, December 13th, 2012

Gift Basket

Step up your usual wrapping job this year by presenting gifts in these farmer’s berry baskets ($2.50 for six, plus $8 shipping; bakeitpretty.com). They’re just like the ones from the market and they’re the perfect size for homemade truffles or small presents like these polka-dot napkins from Anthropologie ($24 for four; anthropologie.com). The baskets are available in both pint and half-pint sizes.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Preheat Your Roasting Pan

by in Food Network Magazine, December 11th, 2012

Roasted Carrots and Peas

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To cut down on roasting time for dense vegetables like carrots and potatoes, preheat a metal baking sheet or roasting pan in the oven for at least 10 minutes. When the food hits the pan, it will get a blast of heat that jump-starts the cooking.

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