All Posts By Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. A regular contributor to The Los Angeles Times, she has also written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Glamour, Marie Claire and Wine Spectator, among other print publications, as well as for websites including The Daily Beast, MSN, Babble, AOL/Huffington Post and Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer.

Look Out for Sticker Shock at the Coffee Shop

by in News, August 11th, 2016

Look Out for Sticker Shock at the Coffee ShopBad news, coffee addicts: It may soon cost more to fill your cup.

Thanks to strong demand and a comparatively weak global supply, arabica and robusta coffee beans may get pricier; it’s possible they’ll become the priciest they’ve been since early 2015, Reuters reported, citing its own poll of 11 traders and analysts.

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LeBron James’ Pizza Order Is Some Kind of Slam Dunk

by in News, August 10th, 2016

LeBron James' Pizza Order Is Some Kind of Slam DunkPop-quiz time! Which of the following toppings and extra ingredients does LeBron James order on his pizza: high-rise dough, spicy red sauce, shredded mozzarella, Parmesan, grilled chicken, turkey meatballs, banana peppers, cherry tomatoes, fresh basil, garlic, green bell peppers, Kalamata olives, red onions, spinach, sea salt, oregano, arugula, olive oil drizzle?

It turns out that the answer is all of them. And while you’re at it, throw in an entree-size arugula with seasonal fruit salad (with chicken, please) and a S’more Pie — though presumably the NBA star prefers those on the side and not on the pizza itself. (Even if he did want the salad and campfire-evocative dessert on top of his ‘za, how would they fit with all those other add-ons?)

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Could This Be the End of Mushy Tomatoes?

by in News, August 9th, 2016

Tomatoes Get the Full GMO TreatmentThere’s nothing quite like a tomato at the peak of ripeness — firm, round and beautifully deep-hued, fragrant and sweet. Honestly, a good, ripe tomato is like candy.

Yet a few days later, that same tomato, past its prime, may be soft, puckered and hardly appealing — which is why, one imagines, the fruit is now getting the full GMO treatment from researchers.

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Why a Balky Coffeemaker May Delay Your Flight

by in News, August 9th, 2016

Why a Balky Coffee Maker May Delay Your FlightHave you ever been sitting on the tarmac, ready for takeoff, when suddenly your plane has to taxi back to the gate because the coffee machine isn’t working? Apparently, that’s a thing.

According to The New York Times, broken coffeemakers are a surprisingly common cause of plane delays, although specific statistics are scant on how significant a factor they are overall: “You can’t just put Mr. Coffee in an airline,” Jeff Lowe, president of the airplane repair concern Aviation Fabricators, told the Times. “You have to do all kinds of engineering and analysis and provide test results to the F.A.A. to get approval.”

Some interesting facts about airplane coffeemakers, revealed in the Times:

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The Smithsonian Is Hiring a Beer Scholar (Casual Sippers Need Not Apply)

by in News, August 4th, 2016

Dream Job Alert: The Smithsonian Is Hiring a Beer ScholarIt’s a historic first in beer scholarship — or at least a first for beer scholars/historians. (And how many of us knew there even were beer scholars/historians?) Inspired, in part, by the craft beer movement, the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, in Washington, D.C., is now looking to hire its first-ever beer historian/scholar to work on the Smithsonian Food History Project’s American Brewing History Initiative.

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Frosting-Filled Croissants Are Now a Thing

by in News, August 2nd, 2016

Frosting-Filled Croissants Are Now a ThingAttention, treat-loving thrill seekers: The latest dessert-like breakfast food (or breakfast-food-like dessert) to pick up the Cronut’s freaky food-mash-up mantle is the frosting-filled croissant. (It really needs a catchy name: Perhaps the froissant?)

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How Much Do Olympic Athletes Eat?

by in News, August 1st, 2016

How Much Do Olympic Athletes Eat?The countdown to the Rio Olympics, which kick off Friday, Aug. 5, is ticking away fast, and final preparations (the pretty and the not so pretty) are underway.

How do Olympians themselves prep for competition? For one thing, they eat a lot of food. For a recent video, The Washington Post surveyed statements some of them had made to the press about their diets and crunched the numbers to come up with their approximate daily caloric intake.

Here are the calorie counts for three U.S. athletes on the Post’s list:

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Just the Thing for a Hot Day: Slurpee Delivery by Drone

by in News, July 29th, 2016

Just the Thing for a Hot Day: Slurpee Delivery by DroneIt’s a hot-day dream come true: Slurpee delivery by drone. I mean, just imagine: There you are, mowing the lawn or just running errands in the heat and you’re feeling steamy, parched, in the mood for a frosty beverage.

Suddenly, look, up in the sky! It’s a bird, it’s a plane … it’s a 7-Eleven drone bringing you a Slurpee — and whatever else you’ve ordered from your friendly neighborhood always-open convenience store. It’s like those old Kool-Aid commercials — only, you know, icier.

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Why You Can’t Cut Corners When You Cut Vegetables

by in News, July 26th, 2016

Why You Can’t Cut Corners When You Cut VegetablesDoes the way you cut vegetables change the way they taste? It’s a question many cooks have pondered as they painstakingly slice and dice, shred and chiffonade, julienne and brunoise, or … uh … chop. Really, does all that careful knife work make a difference, flavorwise?

Writing on NPR’s The Salt blog, “biologist-turned-science-writer” Carolyn Beans recently sought an answer to that very question and consulted several experts. And those experts told her the answer is (no need to mince words) yes.

Here’s why:

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What Are Millennial Foodies Eating?

by in News, July 25th, 2016

Millennials are into food — big-time. Nearly half — 46 percent — of Americans ages 25 to 33 consider themselves “foodies,” as do 42 percent of those ages 13 to 33, according to a new survey by youth marketing and millennial research firm Ypulse. And no, the recession really didn’t do much to quell these young people’s hunger for new and different food experiences.

“To get through the financial crises, young consumers opted to spend on experiences instead of expensive material goods like houses or cars,” Ypulse asserted. “As a result, food has become a new status symbol and a form of social currency.”

One look at the food porn on Instagram will bear this out.

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