All Posts By Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. Her work has appeared in publications including The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Glamour and Marie Claire, as well as Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer. In addition to contributing to FN Dish, she blogs for Food Network’s Healthy Eats.

Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit Card

by in News, March 8th, 2017

Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit CardRaise your hand if this has ever happened to you: You’ve opened a tab at a bar and had a few drinks with friends, only to realize, after you’ve responsibly made your way home, that, in your post-cocktail haze, you’ve left your credit card or ID with the bartender and have to find your way back to the bar to claim it. Bummer. Or, how about this: At the end of the night, you’re looking to settle up your tab with the bartender, but the bar is so packed with other revelers that you can barely get near it, let alone catch the bartender’s eye. (I, personally, seem to don some sort of cloak of invisibility every time I get near a bar. What is that about?)

Mastercard has just come up with something to solve both of those problems. “Open Tab,” a new feature on the company’s mobile order and payment platform, Qkr! With Masterpass, lets you to open a tab at a bar, club or restaurant without having to hand over your credit card or ID. (Qkr! With Masterpass, in use in several countries around the world, is expanding to the United States this year.)

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Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to Selfies

by in News, March 6th, 2017

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to SelfiesGwyneth Paltrow is expanding her empire and making it easier for the world to follow her food lead. The actress-turned-food-writer and healthy-lifestyle advocate is opening an organic cafe in New York, the next iteration in an endeavor that began in 2015 as a summer-in-the-Hamptons pop-up health-food purveyor.

Set to open in March adjacent to Paltrow pal and celebrity fitness trainer Tracy Anderson’s new private fitness studio — where membership will run you $900 a month, not to mention the $1,500 initiation fee — the new eatery, 3 Green Hearts, will offer coffee, juices, smoothies and healthy prepared meals. (The third member of the green-heart trio is Tracy Anderson CEO Maria Baum.)

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How Butter Was Born — and Why It Spread

by in News, March 5th, 2017

How Butter Was Born — and Why It SpreadNow that butter is back in our culture’s collective good graces, butter lovers (read: most of us, since butter consumption recently hit a 40-year high) may be ready to regard its past. That may be the thinking behind “Butter: A Rich History,” a new book whose author, food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova, has been making the rounds to dish about butter’s rise from its origins to its exalted place on our tables today.

The promotion of Khosrova’s book has provided those she has spoken with the opportunity to whip out their best butter puns. (“Spread” is a constant, but bonus points to Smithsonian magazine headline writers for shmearing it on thick with a double pun: New Book Clarifies Butter’s Spread …).

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Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf Salad

by in News, March 4th, 2017

Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf SaladThe Waldorf salad, with its sweetness and its crunch, is a classic for a reason. There’s a lot to love about its blend of apples, celery, walnuts and lettuce, with just the right amount of mayo and lemon, maybe some grapes. For most of us, the Waldorf seems like a salad staple, something that’s always been there. But, on the occasion of this week’s closing (temporarily, for renovations) of its namesake New York City hotel, the Waldorf Astoria, the New York Times has recalled the salad’s origins.

Here is the lowdown on how one of America’s favorite salads came to be — and why a Waldorf salad is called a Waldorf salad:

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Would You Pay $18 for a Cup of Coffee?

by in News, March 2nd, 2017

Would You Pay $18 for a Cup of Coffee?Get this: A new coffee spot in Brooklyn (where else?) is banking that some people will shell out a full $18 for its premium bespoke brew.

Brooklyn Extraction Lab’s sticker-shock-inducing java is, Eater recently pointed out, the “most expensive coffee in the U.S.” It nudges into second place a $16 cup sold by a high-end San Francisco coffee purveyor, Blue Bottle, Gothamist notes. And that in turn unseated the $15 pour-over at Berkeley, California-based coffee joint Equator, which we’re sure unseated some $14 cup of coffee … somewhere.

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Italian Restaurant Owner Rewards Parents of Well-Behaved Children

by in News, Restaurants, March 1st, 2017

Italian Restaurant Owner Rewards Parents of Well-Behaved ChildrenHow do you say genius in Italian? Because that may be just the word for the one restaurant owner who came up with an inspired method of dealing with kids’ behavior at his upscale eatery in Padua, Italy. He simply rewards the parents — when their kids behave well, that is.

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The Finnish Have a Word for Drinking at Home in Your Underwear

by in News, February 28th, 2017

The Finnish Have a Word for Drinking at Home in Your UnderwearYou could file this one under “Ideas long overdue.” However, we’re certainty that almost all of us have had this particular idea before — and have acted on it whenever given the opportunity. It’s just that we never had a word for it.

Now, thanks to Finland, we have a word for “the feeling when you are going to get drunk home alone in your underwear — with no intention of going out,” and it is Kalsarikännit.

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Veggie-Inspired Jewelry with a Romaine Heart of Gold

by in News, February 27th, 2017

Veggie-Inspired Jewelry with a Romaine Heart of GoldThough it may be beautiful and glittery, expensive jewelry may seem like an unnecessary splurge. If you’re going to blow big bucks on something, you may think to yourself, perhaps it should be something that makes a difference in the world.

Now you can have your gorgeous jewelry and … OK, maybe not eat it, too, but at least know your money is helping kids eat healthy. New York-based jewelry designer and philanthropist Joan Hornig — whose jewelry is sold at luxury department stores (Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus) and boutiques around the country and who routinely allocates a cut of the sales of her collections to a range of charities — has introduced a new line of beautiful bobbles to benefit the Recipe for Success Foundation, a Houston-based non-profit organization that works to promote healthy eating in children.

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This Purse Has a Secret That’s Perfect for Sipping

by in News, February 24th, 2017

This Purse Has a Secret That's Perfect for SippingYou’re out and about, and suddenly you realize it’s the perfect time to enjoy a glass of wine — while on a ridge overlooking a gorgeous sunset, say, or in the midst of a stroll or picnic with your main squeeze. Wouldn’t it be great if a spout suddenly materialized from that fetching purse you’re carrying and began dispensing the wine of your choice?

Guess what: Someone’s come up with a solution. Bella Vita’s PortoVino wine purse comes with a hidden, zippered, insulated compartment into which you can tuck a removable 1.5-liter bladder that you can fill with your favorite hooch (high-end, to match the bag, of course).

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Confused About the Expiration Dates on Foods? You’re Not Alone

by in News, February 22nd, 2017

Confused About the Expiration Dates on Foods? You're Not AloneIf you’ve tossed food a day or two past the “sell by” date on its label, figuring it’s not safe to eat, you may have been throwing away perfectly edible food. Such labels often mean the food tastes best — fresher — if it’s consumed by that date, but not that it’s not safe to eat thereafter.

Bummer about all the wasted food, but you’re surely not alone. Most of us, when it comes right down to it, have no real clue what those dates on the packaging of the foods we eat are trying to tell us. “Sell by,” “best by,” “use by,” “better if used by” and (more starkly) “expires on” — what’s the difference, and what are we supposed to do once the date that follows those words has past?

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