All Posts By Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. A regular contributor to The Los Angeles Times, she has also written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Glamour, Marie Claire and Wine Spectator, among other print publications, as well as for websites including The Daily Beast, MSN, Babble, AOL/Huffington Post and Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer.

This Is How Much American Dinners Have Changed in 100 Years

by in News, November 18th, 2015

This Is How Much American Dinners Have Changed in 100 YearsWe know we’re slaves to fashion when it comes to the clothes we wear, but sometimes we forget just how of-the-moment the foods we eat are.

We Americans weren’t always dining on grilled salmon, quinoa and kale salad for our evening meal (so 2015) — something the video makers at make super-clear in this video surveying 100 years of dinner trends in less than three minutes.

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Colorful Packaged Foods Are Taking a Natural Turn

by in News, November 15th, 2015

Colorful Packaged Foods Are Taking a Natural TurnMany otherwise vigilant parents at least occasionally look the other way as their children eagerly scarf down candies, snacks and drinks dyed vivid, frankly unnatural, shades of pink, purple, orange, red, yellow, green and blue. But as we Americans become more deliberate about the foods we eat, we’re growing increasingly uneasy about the potential effects of all those artificial colors — Blues 1 and 2, Red 40, Yellows 5 and 6 — and their lurid, unimaginatively named ilk.

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Is Cafe Mocha to Winter As Pumpkin Spice Is to Autumn?

by in News, November 13th, 2015

Is Cafe Mocha to Winter As Pumpkin Spice Is to Autumn?Are you feeling unapologetically pumpkin spiced out as autumn begins to give way to winter? Wondering what seasonal stunt flavor comes next? Wonder no longer: It’s cafe mocha.

Sure, sure, winter has often been considered the season of peppermint — what with candy canes and all. But this year Mars is apparently augmenting its minty winter holiday candy offerings with Christmassy bags of cafe mocha-flavored M&M’s.

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Guinness Is Going Vegan

by in Drinks, News, November 12th, 2015

Guinness Beer Is Going VeganSoon even vegetarians and vegans will be able enjoy a nice pint of Guinness. That’s because the stout will no longer include traces of dried fish bladder.

Perhaps you didn’t know Ireland’s favorite beer featured fish bladder in the first place. Indeed, for 256 years, the stout has been filtered using isinglass, a fish byproduct used by some brewers to accelerate the settling of yeast in beer. Most of the bladder is filtered out in the process, but some residue — “minute quantities,” as Guinness put it — may remain.

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Presidential Turkey Grower Joe Hedden Takes Our Questions, Plus: Did You Know That Turkeys Like Country Music?

by in Holidays, News, November 9th, 2015

Presidential Turkey Grower Joe Hedden Takes Our Questions

The pardoning of the presidential turkey is a Thanksgiving tradition as familiar and beloved as ogling giant parade floats and eating way too much pie. But how much do we really know about it?

Some say the POTUS turkey pardon traces its origins back to Abraham Lincoln, who, legend has it, once pardoned a turkey destined for his family’s Thanksgiving table after his son Tad made an impassioned argument that the bird should be allowed to live. Maybe.

What’s more certain is that handpicked Thanksgiving birds have been presented to presidents since 1893, that the National Turkey Federation took over the honors in 1947, and that, in most cases, the turkeys ended up on the presidents’ holiday tables, served up with all the trimmings. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy unofficially pardoned the turkey presented to him — “We’ll just let this one grow,” he said — and sent it back to the farm from which it came. Subsequent presidential turkeys were then sent on to a local petting farm, and in 1989 President George H.W. Bush made the presidential turkey pardon official.

Historically, the pardoning ceremony takes place shortly before Thanksgiving in the White House Rose Garden, although inclement weather has, on occasion, prompted a change of venue, as in 2009, when President Obama had to move it to the North Portico. Perhaps the location change made the president peckish, because he remarked that he had been tempted to eat the “good-lookin’ bird,” named Courage, but, “thanks to the intervention of Malia and Sasha,” the turkey’s life would be spared.

This year, the presidential turkey will be chosen from a flock of 50 toms currently being raised expressly for this purpose by Foster Farms, a family farm in California’s Central Valley, which also provided the presidential turkey in 2010.

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Can You Guess Which Food Is Most Addictive?

by in News, November 8th, 2015

Can You Guess Which Food Is Most Addictive?Science has pinpointed the most-addictive food. Care to hazard a guess as to what it is?

Go on, give it a try.

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Why Did This Cracker Just Sell for $23,000?

by in News, November 2nd, 2015

Why Did This Cracker Just Sell for $23,000?That’s how many crisp bills a collector in Greece shelled out for a Spillers and Bakers “Pilot” biscuit that survived the sinking of the Titanic (apparently without getting even a little soggy), making it, quite possibly, the most-expensive cracker of all time.

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Is Sushi Better with Butter?

by in News, October 30th, 2015

Is Sushi Better with Butter?Certainly there are those among us who think that pretty much everything tastes better with butter. Toast, naturally. Pancakes, sure. Popcorn, corn on the cob — those go without saying. But … sushi?

Jinen, a popular chain of sushi restaurants in Japan, is now offering its customers sushi with a long, not-so-skinny fingerlike pat of butter on them — and the hungry, fish-loving masses apparently can’t get enough of them.

The unagi butter sushi — which consists of the usual morsel of rice (vinegared, in this case), layered with unagi (grilled freshwater eel) sushi, topped off with a sizable strip of butter and held together with a strip of nori seaweed — is melting the hearts of eaters across the city of Osaka, where the chain is based, RocketNews24 reports.

“I’ve been wanting to have this!” one diner captioned an Instagram photo of the butter sushi. “Excellent!”

Bet it would be good on tamago (egg) sushi too.

Photo courtesy of @yoshitch

Never Heard of Baijiu? Here’s What You Need to Know

by in Drinks, News, October 29th, 2015

Never Heard of Baijiu? Here’s What You Need to KnowPop quiz! Baijiu is … (pick one)

A. The French word for “jewelry”

B. The first name of a model-actress who’s the daughter of that guy from the Mamas and the Papas

C. A marshy body of water in the Southern United States

D. That song Megan sang to Don for his 40th birthday on Mad Men

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Food Porn: The Good, the Bad and the All Too Pretty

by in News, October 28th, 2015

Food Porn: The Good, the Bad and the All-Too PrettyIf you can’t seem to stop yourself, despite your best efforts, from indulging in deliciously decadent foods, and you’re looking to point the finger elsewhere, science has just provided you with a new scapegoat: food porn.

Yes, friends, according to a recent research review conducted by an international group of psychologists and neuroscientists and published in the journal Brain and Cognition, those gorgeous photos of perfectly presented dishes and desserts we can’t get enough of — on Instagram, in magazines and cookbooks, and even (sorry) online — may be making us fat.

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