All Posts By Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. Her work has appeared in publications including The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Glamour and Marie Claire, as well as Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer. In addition to contributing to FN Dish, she blogs for Food Network’s Healthy Eats.

Mayonnaise Gets Its Moment at 2 Pop-Up Cafes in Japan

by in News, March 22nd, 2017

Mayonnaise Gets Its Moment at 2 Pop-Up Cafes in JapanPeople tend to have their favorite condiments. Ketchup on everything? Mustard for the win? Hey, whatever floats your boat. Those who are partial to mayonnaise now have bragging rights over this: Japan is erecting two temporary shrines to the creamy-white food topper.

Kewpie mayonnaise, a Japanese mayo with a cultlike following (it even has its own museum), is opening a dedicated pop-up “Kewpie mayo café” first in Tokyo (March 1-31) and then in Nagoya (April 3-30). The cafes will feature “a menu of ‘Mayonnaise Magic’ that improves texture, richness and umami by using mayonnaise” — not only as an ingredient in salads, but also to fry, bake and saute foods — according to a press release (translation from Japanese via Google Translate).

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Why Are No-Alcohol Wines All the Buzz?

by in Drinks, News, March 21st, 2017

Why Are No-Alcohol Wines All the Buzz?Wines with no or low alcohol content may sound, to buzz-loving oenophiles, like a day without sunshine, but (trend watch?) the New York Daily News has declared them to be “a thing.”

The paper relays that NA wine sales in the year ending January 28, 2017 have been a “robust” $99 million annually, according to Nielsen data, yet it notes that sales the year prior were actually 5.4 percent higher.

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Modest Lunch Spot in France Mistakenly Awarded a Michelin Star

by in News, Restaurants, March 18th, 2017

Modest Lunch Spot in France Mistakenly Awarded a Michelin StarEveryone makes mistakes, and chortling over those of others can make a person feel uncharitable. (People who live in glass houses and all …) Still, it’s hard not to gawp and guffaw at a recent error — one as amusing as it was alarming — by the Michelin hotel and restaurant guide.

The august arbiter of taste messed up last month when it accidentally awarded one of its prestigious stars to a restaurant called Le Bouche à Oreille in Bourges, a town in central France. The coveted Michelin star was actually intended for a different restaurant named Le Bouche à Oreille, a fancy fine-dining establishment in Boutervilliers, near Paris.

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Independent Restaurants Are Dropping Fast

by in News, Restaurants, March 16th, 2017

Independent Restaurants Are Dropping FastWhen a favorite restaurant closes, often all you are left with is the memory of a beloved dish. Sure, you can flip through a mental scrapbook of these late, lamented meals from now-defunct eateries, savoring the recollected flavors. But you’ll never actually taste them again. So sad.

If lately it seems like you’ve been adding pages to that meal memory book at a record rate, a recent restaurant-industry report provides evidence that may in fact be the case.

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Ina Garten, Andrew Zimmern Among 2017 James Beard Foundation Nominees

by in Food Network Chef, News, March 15th, 2017

Ina Garten, Andrew Zimmern Among 2017 James Beard Foundation NomineesEach year, somewhere between March entering like a lion and going out like lamb, the James Beard Foundation announces the nominees for its prestigious annual awards. Considered the culinary world’s equivalent of the Academy Awards, the accolades are bestowed in almost 60 (count them!) categories, spanning areas including cookbooks, broadcast media, restaurant design, and restaurants and chefs.

The 2017 nominees were announced Wednesday morning at a.o.c., in Los Angeles, over breakfast (Spanish fried chicken with cornmeal waffles; brioche with prosciutto, gruyere and quail egg; pastries) prepared by the restaurant’s James Beard Award-winning chef Suzanne Goin, and streamed via Facebook Live for the curious (and possibly hungry) masses.

If you missed it, no worries. You can find a complete list of nominees here. The winners of the 2017 James Beard Media Awards, honoring cookbook authors, food journalists, and culinary broadcast producers and hosts, will be announced in New York on Tuesday, April 25. Awards in the remaining categories, including Restaurant and Chef and Restaurant Design, will be presented at the James Beard Awards Gala, which will be held in Chicago on Monday, May 1.

Among the 2017 James Beard Foundation Book Award nominees is Food Network’s own Ina Garten. She has been nominated in the General Cooking category for her book Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook (Clarkson Potter). The other nominees in that category are Cook’s Science: How to Unlock Flavor in 50 of Our Favorite Ingredients (Cook’s Illustrated), by the editors at Cook’s Illustrated, and Eat in My Kitchen: To Cook, to Bake, to Eat, and to Treat (Prestel), by Meike Peters.

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Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit Card

by in News, March 8th, 2017

Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit CardRaise your hand if this has ever happened to you: You’ve opened a tab at a bar and had a few drinks with friends, only to realize, after you’ve responsibly made your way home, that, in your post-cocktail haze, you’ve left your credit card or ID with the bartender and have to find your way back to the bar to claim it. Bummer. Or, how about this: At the end of the night, you’re looking to settle up your tab with the bartender, but the bar is so packed with other revelers that you can barely get near it, let alone catch the bartender’s eye. (I, personally, seem to don some sort of cloak of invisibility every time I get near a bar. What is that about?)

Mastercard has just come up with something to solve both of those problems. “Open Tab,” a new feature on the company’s mobile order and payment platform, Qkr! With Masterpass, lets you to open a tab at a bar, club or restaurant without having to hand over your credit card or ID. (Qkr! With Masterpass, in use in several countries around the world, is expanding to the United States this year.)

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Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to Selfies

by in News, March 6th, 2017

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to SelfiesGwyneth Paltrow is expanding her empire and making it easier for the world to follow her food lead. The actress-turned-food-writer and healthy-lifestyle advocate is opening an organic cafe in New York, the next iteration in an endeavor that began in 2015 as a summer-in-the-Hamptons pop-up health-food purveyor.

Set to open in March adjacent to Paltrow pal and celebrity fitness trainer Tracy Anderson’s new private fitness studio — where membership will run you $900 a month, not to mention the $1,500 initiation fee — the new eatery, 3 Green Hearts, will offer coffee, juices, smoothies and healthy prepared meals. (The third member of the green-heart trio is Tracy Anderson CEO Maria Baum.)

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How Butter Was Born — and Why It Spread

by in News, March 5th, 2017

How Butter Was Born — and Why It SpreadNow that butter is back in our culture’s collective good graces, butter lovers (read: most of us, since butter consumption recently hit a 40-year high) may be ready to regard its past. That may be the thinking behind “Butter: A Rich History,” a new book whose author, food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova, has been making the rounds to dish about butter’s rise from its origins to its exalted place on our tables today.

The promotion of Khosrova’s book has provided those she has spoken with the opportunity to whip out their best butter puns. (“Spread” is a constant, but bonus points to Smithsonian magazine headline writers for shmearing it on thick with a double pun: New Book Clarifies Butter’s Spread …).

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Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf Salad

by in News, March 4th, 2017

Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf SaladThe Waldorf salad, with its sweetness and its crunch, is a classic for a reason. There’s a lot to love about its blend of apples, celery, walnuts and lettuce, with just the right amount of mayo and lemon, maybe some grapes. For most of us, the Waldorf seems like a salad staple, something that’s always been there. But, on the occasion of this week’s closing (temporarily, for renovations) of its namesake New York City hotel, the Waldorf Astoria, the New York Times has recalled the salad’s origins.

Here is the lowdown on how one of America’s favorite salads came to be — and why a Waldorf salad is called a Waldorf salad:

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Would You Pay $18 for a Cup of Coffee?

by in News, March 2nd, 2017

Would You Pay $18 for a Cup of Coffee?Get this: A new coffee spot in Brooklyn (where else?) is banking that some people will shell out a full $18 for its premium bespoke brew.

Brooklyn Extraction Lab’s sticker-shock-inducing java is, Eater recently pointed out, the “most expensive coffee in the U.S.” It nudges into second place a $16 cup sold by a high-end San Francisco coffee purveyor, Blue Bottle, Gothamist notes. And that in turn unseated the $15 pour-over at Berkeley, California-based coffee joint Equator, which we’re sure unseated some $14 cup of coffee … somewhere.

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