A Comeback for Cans, Old Bay’s New Fame and Morrissey’s Fondness for Cheese

by in News, May 9th, 2014

A Comeback for CansWhat’s in Your “Cantry”? When you think of health food, you probably don’t think of reaching for your can opener. The Canned Food Alliance, a consortium of steel producers and can makers, is trying to change that. The alliance is in the midst of a full-on push to reposition canned foods as a convenient, healthy option; to lobby to ensure canned foods are included in federal programs; and to commission nutritional studies to underscore the wonders of canned food, sales of which have waned over the last decade. The industry wants consumers to embrace a new word, “cantry,” which it would like to see replace “pantry” in Americans’ vocabulary. “Cantry”? Well, I guess they can … try. [Reuters]

Everything Old Bay Is New Again: Old Bay Seasoning, now celebrating its 75th anniversary, is poised to break free of its Mid-Atlantic regional confines and claw its way, crablike, into the national spotlight. The Washington Post’s Wonkblog crunched the numbers on the spicy Maryland pantry (er, cantry?) staple and found that interest in it seems to be spiking. In fact, in recent years, Google-search interest in Old Bay Seasoning “has caught up to and appears to be surpassing interest in Tabasco for the first time,” Wonkblog reports. Impressive. Here’s hoisting a Flying Dog Dead Rise Old Bay Summer Ale in your honor, Old Bay. Yes, now you can get a beer that tastes like summer in Baltimore. No crab mallets needed. [Washington Post]

A Taste of the Future: As Baby Boomers, Generation Z (ages 0-23) and Millennials (ages 24-37) age, and Hispanics make up a greater percentage of the U.S. population, the way America eats is likely to change, a new study has found. According to “The Future of Eating: Who’s Eating What in 2018?” a report by the NPD Group, younger generations “want more involvement, not necessarily more complexity, in preparing their food and meals, particularly at breakfast.” As a consequence, “breakfast foods that are perceived to be fresher and require more prep or cooking, like eggs, hot cereal and center plate proteins, are projected to grow by 8 percent over the next five years.” The study also forecast an increase in the consumption of traditional Latino foods. And in a trend driven by health-focused aging Boomers, an uptick is also expected in the consumption of “whole grains, protein and calcium,” or foods that are “low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium.” [NPD Group]

In Other Food News: Eataly in New York is following Chicago’s lead and putting in a Nutella Bar. [Eater] Burger King is getting in on the fast-food breakfast wars by offering burgers and fries for breakfast. [Associated Press] If a Twitter-posted image purportedly of a Smiths tour rider from 1986 is legit, Morrissey really likes “thinly cut” cheese sandwiches, nuts and fruit, but he’s agnostic on whether you give him biscuits or cake. [Spin]

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