Watch the Top 5 Dirtiest Restaurants on Restaurant: Impossible

by in Shows, November 19th, 2013


While some businesses on Restaurant: Impossible struggle with problems that are in full view of the customers, like a feuding wait staff or dingy carpeting and chipped paint in the dining room, others’ issues are trapped behind closed doors in the kitchen. It’s only when Robert Irvine and his Restaurant: Impossible team arrive and shine a light on the back of the house that the horrible truths of some eateries’ kitchens are revealed.

Over the years on Restaurant: Impossible, Robert has discovered a range of uncleanliness in restaurant kitchens — some simply untidy and many in need of a solid scrubbing. But then there are those that are infested with insects, have surfaces caked in several years’ worth of grease and are outfitted with refrigerators full of spoiling food. The cleaning of these establishments often requires not only time and money from Robert’s budget, but also a serious lesson from the host himself on how to maintain proper food standards in the restaurant.

Click the play button on the video above to see inside the five dirtiest eateries ever featured on Restaurant: Impossible, and watch as Robert is forced to don protective gear in one instance in order to safely come face-to-face with the filth. Then check out more top-five video mash-ups, like the most-stubborn owners, most-emotional reveals and worst staff moments.

Tune in to an all-new Restaurant: Impossible tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 20, at 10pm/9c.

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Comments (4)

  1. Abishai100 says:

    I attended Dartmouth College (Hanover, New Hampshire) where the food is highly-rated. I developed my lifelong interest in food and bistros. I am now planning a people-friendly bistro business with my business partner Steve. I enjoy "Restaurant: Impossible" (Robert Irvine), simply because it helps me think about how to manage food hospitality related renovations.

    Steven and I are thinking about running an alternative recipes hot dog stand in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for 5 years and using the saved up profits from it to take a decent loan to open a modest bistro in Amsterdam, Holland or Seattle, Washington. Design is only as important as restaurant/bistro cleanliness. Steve and I are committed to bistro cleanliness, and we're excited about having someone who understands ornament hygiene ratings like Robert Irvine potentially visiting (and improving) the "scenic" cleanliness and coziness quality of our future "folk-friendly" bistro.

  2. tina says:

    #2 on the list is closed and up for sale

  3. W. H. Franklin says:

    I spent several years in the Navy and the Army. The MOST important thing is a clean mess area. You can have the most sophisticated weapons system in the world, but if you've got the squirts from a greasy fork or contaminated salad, you'd be hard put to operate that weapons system. HOT water, soap, and a dedication for cleanliness are probably more important in food service than the menu, service, or selection.

  4. MidwestChef says:

    One restaurant not on the list, but should have been, was closed last week by the health inspector
    Read the story in the local news – http://www.hollandsentinel.com/article/20131217/N

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