Connected: Wired Magazine Digs Up Tasty Food Data with FoodNetwork.com

by in News, October 23rd, 2013

Wired Pie ChartIt’s a big month at Food Network. As the network celebrates its 20th birthday and its fans gear up for the year’s biggest food holiday, Thanksgiving, its website took the spotlight in Wired’s November issue. Wired’s editors looked at the site’s nearly 50,000 recipes and its almost 1 million comments to answer, once and for all, questions about what foods Americans are cooking and how. With kid-friendly classics like hamburgers and pasta with meatballs to dressed-up dishes like risotto, creme brulee and souffles — and seemingly every imaginable meal in between — FoodNetwork.com’s database offered the ultimate one-stop resource for number-crunching of the recipe sort. What resulted was an impressive eight-page spread: one of the most exhaustive data collections to date and a better understanding of what we’re putting on the family table.

Just in time for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, Wired investigated one of the most celebrated slivers of FoodNetwork.com — Thanksgiving Central — to offer “The Only Thanksgiving Guide You Want.” This course-by-course breakdown encompasses not only deliciously simple seasonal recipes and how-tos to help you shop for these dishes, but also interactive charts that allow for easy decision-making when selecting between the many mashed potato, stuffing, gravy and pie offerings available. Just take your pick among recipes that require “Marathon Shopping” and “Slaving at the Stove,” or opt for the “Labors of Love” or something “Quick and Easy,” and serve up a holiday-worthy feast in a flash.

Wired GraphThe report highlights some of your favorite Food Network stars, as well, pitting each chef’s recipes against the others’ in a “Celebrity Chef Smackdown.” Given their different cooking styles and penchants for signature ingredients, it’s no surprise that Bobby, Alton, Giada, Guy, Ina and Rachael all have dedicated fan bases, but it turns out that Giada is especially adored in Scottsdale, Ariz., while Bobby is favored in Fremont, Calif. Breaking down each chef’s style a bit further, Wired dubbed Rachael “the cheesiest chef,” as her recipes call for 148 pounds of cheese in all, and as a group, the female stars are more likely to cook with chicken than the guys.

Given all of the different recipes, it’s no surprise that you may have trouble deciding what’s for dinner tonight. Wired revealed that on FoodNetwork.com, there are no fewer than 264 ways to prepare roast chicken and 280 to grill a steak. And considering there are some 14,823 entree, 5,613 side and 9,182 dessert recipes for the taking, you’ll be choosing from billions of meals — 763,956,163,818 to be exact — on any given day. How long would it take to prepare these recipes? A whopping 89,963 hours in total.

Visit Wired.com to find the complete showing of results, as well as details about how home cooks eat up one of the trendiest foods — bacon — and which regions are especially keen on lobster, chili, steak and more.

More posts from .

Similar Posts

You May Be Paying Less for Food Than You Used To

It probably seems to most of us like prices go in only one direction: up. But guess what? Though anyone feeding a family on a budget may find it hard ...

Comments (1)

  1. guest says:

    What this article doesn’t highlight (don’t know if it was deliberately or not) from the Wired Magazine study is that Jeff Mauro (which I believe has a fan base as dedicated as the other hosts at the network) is the personality with the highest rated recipes on Food Network’s website.

    Overall ratings for Food Network Stars (based on ratings users gave to their recipes across six major food groupings: beef, chicken, greens, pork, potato and vegetables):

    Jeff Mauro: 4.8
    Ina Garten: 4.6
    Alton Brown: 4.5
    Guy Fieri: 4.5
    Bobby Flay: 4.5
    Giada de Laurentiis: 4.5
    Rachael Ray: 4.4

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>