Bobby Deen’s Ricotta Cheesecake — The Weekender

by in Entertaining, April 26th, 2013

Bobby Deen's Cheesecake

My birthday is less than a month away, so I’m in the process of conducting my annual cake audition. I got in the habit of making my own celebratory cake some years back as a way to try out intriguing recipes and to stretch my baking skills a little. In the weeks before my big day, I make a few new-to-me cakes, in the hopes of finding something fun and tasty to serve.

Three years ago, I made lavender-infused cupcakes to take to a party in a friend’s garden. Two years ago, I layered and frosted my way to a triple-decker chocolate cake. Last May, I mixed things up with a strawberry-rhubarb pie. It didn’t hold candles well, but it received raves from my friends.

Recently, I’ve had cheesecake on the brain, so I decided to tackle a few different versions in the hopes of finding a worthy candidate. I started with Bobby Deen’s recipe for Ricotta Cheesecake. I was attracted by the fact that it’s lighter than traditional cheesecake — and it’s easy to put together. It can be made in a single bowl and doesn’t require a water bath to keep it tender.

My tasters and I came to the conclusion that while it’s not indulgent enough for a birthday, it may be the perfect spur-of-the-moment cake for casual gatherings. That makes it just perfect for The Weekender!

Bobby Deen's Ricotta CheesecakeBefore you start baking, read these tips:

— The crust is made from ground graham crackers and just a little butter. It won’t look like it will hold together at first, but I promise it will come together if you press firmly with a flat-bottomed measuring cup.

— Don’t worry if there are a few lumps in the batter when it goes into the pan. They will smooth out during baking.

— Baking times on this cheesecake will vary. Mine took a full 10 minutes longer than the recipe suggested.

Marisa McClellan is a food writer and canning teacher who lives in Center City Philadelphia. Find more of her food (all cooked up in her 80-square-foot kitchen) at her blog, Food in Jars. Her first cookbook, Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round, is now available.

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Comments (1)

  1. ClockWatcher says:

    The judges did not attempt the hardest basket in after hours. They should have tried to make delicious meals with the "garbage" or items usually discarded as thought to be spoiling. I also believe too much emphasis is put on one seasoning: salt. In America, we use way too much salt in our food. It would be nice t have some examples of cooking without its use. The judges should also have to do that one for after hours. As famous chefs, they should be able to teach people how to get flavor into food without depending so much on salt. Now, this would be a reality show.

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