Side Dish: More Food on the Web

by in View All Posts, September 28th, 2010
Ina, Thrilled About Pumpkins

The Great Pumpkin Famine Declared Over: Were you among the masses that raided store shelves this time last year to build a bunker filled with canned pumpkin? Or did you shell out $6-$7 a pop on eBay for a coveted can of the orange stuff? This fall, there’s no need to ration your pumpkin goop. Nestle, who sells the cans under its popular Libby’s label, has declared the great pumpkin shortage that began in 2009 officially over. They’ve planted more of this “super food” and they’ve planted it earlier, meaning you now have every right to ask for extra pies, bars, soufflés, trifles, cheesecakes, cookies and, well, we have lots of ideas. [Boston Herald]

Arrested Development-Style Banana Stand Opens In Austin: So much for keeping Austin weird – the wily Texans behind the city’s latest pop-up dessert spot are making it bananas. Fans of the hilariously awkward comedy Arrested Development will appreciate names for Banarchy’s chocolate-dipped frozen bananas like the Afternoon Delight and the Job. Let’s just hope no one burns it down, because remember, there just might be money in that banana stand. [seriouseats.com]

Peaches Make Room for Olives in Georgia: In an attempt to enter the olive oil industry dominated by overseas countries, 95 acres of olive groves will be planted in the Peach State over the next three years. Olives grew in abundance in Georgia from the 1600s through the Civil War, when rice and cotton crops supplanted them. But now, because the United States is the third-largest consumer of olive oil in the world and demand for the staple here continues to grow, Georgia farmers seek to turn this liquid gold into real profit. [Washington Post]

Boston to Put a Cap on Soda Consumption? Government buildings in San Francisco have banned it. City facilities in New York City have restricted it. Now, Boston public officials, concerned about the health of fellow employees, may make it harder to find soda in city vending machines. Bostonians are considering limiting the availability of the sugar-laden drinks on city-owned property because, as Bill Walczak, head of a community health center and a member of the city’s panel, told the Boston Globe, “Somebody has to take a stand, and if it isn’t the government and health care institutions leading the way to a healthier lifestyle, who’s going to do it?’’ [Boston Globe via  consumerist.com]

Here’s our round-up of food news, trends and happenings across the web. Check back for more, and tell us what else you’re loving in the comments.

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