Contain Yourself

by in View All Posts, June 1st, 2009


/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}
If the question “paper or plastic?” drives you to near-psychotic episodes of decidophobia, then do yourself a favor and stop reading now.

Because here’s another one for you: carton (paper), canned (metal), jarred (glass), or pouched (huh?)?

Fortunately, researchers at the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research were brave enough to tackle that one for you.

Their resounding conclusion: based on resource requirements and ecological impact, paperboard cartons are far and away the most environmentally friendly form of food packaging, cutting carbon dioxide emissions and fossil fuel consumption by up to 60% compared with other forms of packaging.

How’s that for a takeaway?

Jonathan Milder, Research Librarian

More posts from .

Similar Posts

Made-Over Game-Day Recipes to Lighten Up Your Party

Make better-for-you versions of game-day classics....