Another “New Cronut”? Why Knot?

by in News, October 25th, 2014

Garlic KnotsYou’re probably pretty sick of hearing about whatever food trend seekers are currently dubbing the “new Cronut.” I know I am. But the latest food item upon which the label has been bestowed does sound rather tasty, though it has nothing to do with Dominique Ansel, the New York City pastry chef who created the croissant hybrid — the original Cronut — that started it all.

OK, OK, “the latest croissant hybrid that actually deserves a line around the block,” as Brooklyn Magazine describes it, is at the epicenter of self-aware Brooklyn hipsterism — Bushwick — and, more specifically, Roberta’s, maker of delish (albeit ultra-hyped) artisanal pizzas, which just started a takeaway outlet for those hoping to skip the long waits for a table. But the local mag calls the takeout joint’s new garlic knots “revelatory.”

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New Takes on Classic Sweet Potato Casseroles

by in Holidays, Recipes, October 25th, 2014

Whipped Sweet Potatoes and Bananas with HoneyFor holiday celebrations and weeknight dinners alike, mashed potatoes often take center stage when it comes to easy, family-friendly spud recipes, but that doesn’t have to be the case. As you’re planning mealtimes this weekend and even looking ahead to next month’s Thanksgiving feast, swap in sweet potatoes for traditional russets or Yukon golds. These brightly hued beauties surely shine when simply roasted, but they offer over-the-top flavor and indulgent richness when they’re turned into a casserole. Read on below to find some of Food Network’s favorite sweet potato casseroles from Tyler Florence, Trisha Yearwood, the Neelys and Anne Burrell.

Tyler deems simply roasted bananas his “secret weapon” in his easy-to-make Whipped Sweet Potatoes and Bananas with Honey (pictured above), as the fruits manage to “develop their natural sugar” while baking.

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Best 5 Beef Casserole Recipes

by in Recipes, October 25th, 2014

Beef and Cheddar CasseroleWhile some meals require you to make multiple components, casseroles are all-in-one beauties that have starch, vegetable and protein elements built in, so they’re go-to timesavers on hectic weeknights. When you’re considering which ingredients to combine in your casserole, think about which flavors you know work well together, like those in classic pasta dishes, or in tacos, enchiladas and burritos — they’ll likely shine in a casserole as well. Check out Food Network’s best-five casseroles with family-friendly beef as the focus and find top tips from Trisha Yearwood, Sunny Anderson, Rachael Ray and more chefs.

5. Beef and Bean Taco Casserole — Think of this big-batch dinner as a platter of deconstructed tacos, with a base and topping of crunchy tortilla chips and a hearty filling of cumin-laced ground beef and pinto beans.

4. Gwen’s Old-Fashioned Potato-Beef Casserole — The key to Trisha’s easy recipe lies in the prep work for her tender potatoes and cheesy ground beef. Trisha explains, “If they are still hot when you assemble the casserole, the baking time can be greatly reduced or even eliminated; simply brown the crumb topping under the broiler for a couple of minutes.”

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Smothered and Covered Chicken and Gravy — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, October 24th, 2014

I love gravy. I really love gravy. I really, really love gravy. I’d like to think that there are rivers of gravy in heaven. Gravy is a down-home comfort food that soothes, satisfies and satiates like no other. And Smothered and Covered Chicken and Gravy is extra-special. This old-timey recipe is a mash-up of fried chicken and gravy, cooked together in a skillet: Where one ends, the other starts. In other words, pretty much the most nearly perfect comfort food. Ever. Read more

Heritage — Off the Shelf

by in Books, October 24th, 2014

HeritageSean Brock’s new cookbook, Heritage, is easily one of the most-anticipated books of the year. Sean Brock, the Virginia-born executive chef of Husk restaurants in Charleston, S.C., and Nashville, is quickly becoming a titan of Southern cuisine, and the dishes in this book carry his signature blend of elegance and hearty Southern charm. It should be noted right up front that Heritage is not a Husk restaurant cookbook; it’s so much deeper and more thorough than that. Heritage is an edible historical guide to Southern cuisine, and if you give it a chance, it’ll be your new favorite cookbook in no time.

The book is broken down into chapters based on where the ingredients are sourced, including The Garden, The Mill and The Yard, and the introduction includes a whole aside detailing the history of and a recipe for Low-Country Hoppin’ John. Brock also includes for his readers his Manifesto on food, but don’t be fooled: The book doesn’t read like a stuffy, overly structured culinary curriculum. The whole book reads like a love letter to the raw ingredients and agrarians of the South, and getting an inside look at Brock’s passion for preserving Southern heritage seed breeds is a real treat.

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Save Your Pumpkin Seeds: A Simple Roasting How-To

by in Holidays, Recipes, October 24th, 2014

How to Roast Pumpkin SeedsWith Halloween just one week away, you’re likely getting set to carve tricked-out jack-o’-lanterns in preparations for next Friday’s fright night. As you roll up your sleeves and scoop out the mushy innards of your pumpkin, keep an eye out for the seeds; these flat, tear-shaped bites are indeed edible, and when they’re roasted with seasoning, they turn into crunchy, savory bites ideal for seasonal snacking. Learn the basics of How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds below, then check out Food Network’s complete guide to master the easy technique.

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25 Ways to Use Sauerkraut

by , October 24th, 2014

Oktoberfest in Germany may have ended, but you can keep the celebrations going all month long.

Sauerkraut, a traditional German fermented cabbage, isn’t just a delicious hot dog topping or stuffing for Reuben sandwiches. It contains probiotics (those same ones found in yogurt), which help maintain healthy stomach functions, so eat up!

Break out a beer stein and your lederhosen to prepare these delicious sauerkraut-stuffed dishes.

1. All you need to make Alton Brown’s Sauerkraut recipe is cabbage, some spices and a fair amount of time; it takes about two weeks for the cabbage to ferment. Pickling salt is a fine-grain pure salt that doesn’t contain additives like anti-caking agents or iodine that other cooking salts may have.
2. Rachael Ray’s Reuben-Style Casserole with Pastrami Meatballs, Sauerkraut and Barley is an easy make-ahead meal, perfect to warm you up on chilly fall evenings.
3. If you’re an adventurous baker, make Beer and Sauerkraut Fudge Cupcakes with Beer Frosting.
4. Serve Michael Symon’s Bratwurst Stewed with Sauerkraut (pictured above) on a baguette at your next tailgate.
5. A simple Sauerkraut Soup with Sausage is hearty enough to be a full meal.
6. Cook Good Luck Pork and Sauerkraut low and slow on the stovetop or in the slow cooker for meat so tender it falls right off the bones.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by , October 24th, 2014

Scale
In this week’s news: Gluten-free diets spark a grain of concern; slow and steady may not win the weight-loss race; and that regrettably fattening lunch may have been your brain’s fault.

Gluten-free Gotcha?

For people with celiac disease or ...

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